eC2: Market Assessment: Concept Development for PNG Technical Training Center for Women

Deadline: 17-Jun-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

To address both the skills gap and the gender gap, IFC, in partnership with construction

20150224-senegal-farhat-0660

company Rhodes PNG, is exploring the possibility of establishing a technical training college for women in PNG. Rhodes PNG has identified a site located at their Napa Napa campus, outside of Port Moresby, and have indicated they are interested in donating that site for use as a womens technical training college. IFC is now at the stage of conducting a detailed market assessment which will feed into the development of a detailed business plan for the proposed training college (Womens TVET project).

The objective of this assignment is to conduct a landscape analysis and market study to assess the feasibility of the proposed Womens TVET Project. It will include an assessment of the industry demand for skills and commitment toward supporting improved supply of skilled workers; , the current training supply in PNG; as well as the challenges and opportunities for women to access more and better training, and ultimately to access jobs. This assignment also aims to raise awareness of the project and obtain initial buy-in from industry.

Outputs under this assignment will be use to canvass potential investors and inform a go/ no go decision prior to developing a full business plan

Continue reading

Gender equality: Unleashing the real wealth of nations

Last week, we launched the Women, Business, and the Law report, which found that annettedespite the considerable progress that many countries have made in improving women’s legal rights over the last decade, women are still only accorded 75 percent of the legal rights that men, on average, are given. As a result, they are less able to get jobs, start businesses and make economic decisions, with economic consequences that reverberate beyond their families and communities.

Continue reading

Why gender equality in doing business makes good economic sense

Article published on http://www.worldbank.org on November 17, 2016.

Women today represent about 50 percent of the world’s population and, for the past two decades, about 50 percent of the labor force. Yet there are stark differences in the outcomes they achieve: Women are only half as likely as men to have a full-time wage-earning job. The women who do have paid jobs earn as much as one-third less than men. Fewer women than men are involved in trade or own registered companies. And women are more likely to work in low-productivity activities or informal employment.

Continue reading