eC2: Developing a Pay-as-you-Go Solar Policy and Regulatory Handbook for Governments (Phase 1 of 3)

Deadline: 09-Sep-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)energy

As a business model which provides electricity and financing leveraging mobile technology, PAYG is affected by regulations in the electricity, finance, import, data protection, and telecom sectors. Existing policy frameworks have yet to be designed to take PAYG business models into account because evolution has outpaced regulation. Governments are only beginning to understand the sector and its potential. Limited government awareness of and support for PAYG means there is a risk of new regulation or interpretation of existing regulation that handicap the PAYG market. On the other hand, an enhanced regulatory environment could help to accelerate sector growth by de-risking investment and encouraging additional commercial financing. The overall objective of the project is to create a government guidance toolkit, which helps countries to develop an enabling policy and regulatory framework for the PAYG sector. The phase 1 objective is to develop an initial toolkit.

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eC2: A Roadmap for Developing the Wholesale Power Market in India.

Deadline: 27-Jul-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) photo-power-plant

The three priority areas that need to be addressed are: increase liquidity in the short-term trade; adequate mechanisms to support integration of large scale variable renewable energy (VRE) and inclusion of frequency control ancillary services (FCAS) in the wholesale market. The Ministry of Power, Government of India, has therefore decided to prepare a Roadmap for Developing the Wholesale Power Market in India with a focus to assess the current power market scenario in India, review of international experience and prepare a phased plan to support the transition of Indian power market. This transition is expected to cover all three facets discussed briefly above, namely, (a) enhance the volume and percentage of trade in the short-term market relative to long-term counterparts while moving from a regulated regime to a near real-time, (b) support the overall objective of increasing the mix of green energy in the grid and optimizing dispatch, and (c) develop co-optimized FCAS market to ensure the market retains the security of the power system. The assignment would also cover design of appropriate financial instruments to support the new market mechanism and replace traditional power purchase agreements (PPA)/Feed-in Tariffs for renewables and the related policy and regulatory changes. The Ministry of Power has requested the World Bank to support this activity.
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Chart: 47 million people are connected to a mini grid

A mini grid is an electric power generation and distribution system that provides electricity to a localized community. Mini grids will be critical in achieving universal electricity access by 2030. According to a new World Bank report “Mini Grids for Half a Billion People: Market Outlook and Handbook for Decision Makers”, mini grids are often the most economically viable solution for remote areas with high population density and demand and where extending the main grid is prohibitively expensive.

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Today, 47 million people are connected to a mini grid.  Afghanistan, Myanmar, India and Nepal have the highest number of mini grids, followed by China, Philippines, Indonesia. Analysis by the Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP) shows that by 2030, nearly half a billion people could be connected to a mini grid. 

Mini Grids for Half a Billion People: Market Outlook and Handbook for Decision Makers

STORY HIGHLIGHTS MIniGrids_WebBanner.jpg

  • Mini grids have the potential to provide electricity to as many as 500 million people by 2030, with the right policies and about $220 billion of investment to build around 210,000 mini grids.
  • Over the past decade, mini grid costs have declined significantly, while the quality of service has increased. The per kWh cost of mini grid electricity is expected to decrease by two thirds by 2030.
  • Significantly more mini grids will need to be deployed in the top 20 electricity access deficit countries – from 10-50 mini grids currently deployed each year per country to over 1,600.