Making a better poverty map

The digital economy is transforming how data is collected, processed and used for poverty%20map%20hand%20drawn_Page_3.pngevidence-based decisions to monitor and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Promising new methods that combine traditional household survey data with non-traditional data sources (such as mobile phone data, satellite data and text data) are creating opportunities to map poverty at a higher resolution and scale. Nonetheless, significant technical, practical and ethical challenges still hamper the operationalization of these methods.

“The careful combination of ground truth surveys with an abundance of big data increases—not decreases—the value of surveys.”
Marshall Burke

Understanding the “new rurality” in Latin America and what it means to the water and sanitation sector

Despite the urbanization trends seen in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC), it seems 23845439171_fb7b1102e1_othat the rural population in LAC is decreasing in relative terms. In 2001, official figures indicated that 125 million people in LAC resided in rural areas representing 24% of the total LAC population. In 2013, this value decreased to 21% (130 million out of a total population of 609 million inhabitants), and it is estimated that by 2030, the rural population will decrease to represent 16.5% of the total (CEPAL, 2014).

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New country classifications by income level: 2019-2020

Updated country income classifications for the World Bank’s 2020 fiscal year are available World Bank buildinghere.

The World Bank classifies the world’s economies into four income groups — high, upper-middle, lower-middle, and low. We base this assignment on Gross National Income (GNI) per capita (current US$) calculated using the Atlas method. The classification is updated each year on July 1st.

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Harnessing the power of data so no child is left behind

Data plays a crucial role in the 2030 agenda set out by the Sustainable Development grid_titleGoals (SDGs). It helps us to focus policies and make better decisions. It is needed to set targets, measure progress towards those targets and to hold governments accountable to their commitments under the SDGs.

Data is also essential for governments to fulfill their pledge to leave no one behind in the SDGs; that the goals should be met for all segments of society and that those furthest behind should be reached first. Despite significant progress over the last few years, we are still far away from being able to systematically identify those at risk of being left behind or to monitor their progress towards the 2030 commitments.

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Financial innovation and additionality: The power of economic analysis and data analytics

As public and private financial institutions innovate and expand the range of financFinancial Educationial products that households and firms use, questions about how these services are affecting consumers, providers, and the economy as a whole have become central. A new policy brief by Abraham, Schmukler, and Tessada explores how evaluating the “additionality” of financial services can help answer such questions.

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Remarks from World Bank Group President David Malpass at the G20 Leaders Summit, Osaka, Japan

Thank you, Prime Minister Abe, for being such a gracious host. index

It is a great pleasure to be here during the new era of Reiwa, “Beautiful Harmony.” And it’s a true pleasure that the World Bank and Japan have maintained harmony since the early 1960s, notably when the World Bank made a loan to help fund the construction of the bullet train ahead of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. I’ll ride that train tonight as I go to Tokyo. The bullet train and Japan’s many other advances enhanced connectivity and helped lead to Japan’s fast growth and its successful graduation from World Bank lending soon after the Olympics in 1966.

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How important are Global Value Chains for development? Read the new WDR2020 draft report and comment

Following an intense research and writing process over the last 10 months, I am pleased figure_1_-_2020_wdr_framework to announce that a draft of the World Development Report (WDR) 2020 – Trading for Developing in the Age of Global Value Chains is now available online for public comment.

Why Global Value Chains (GVCs) and why now? 

The World Bank’s last report on trade was more than thirty years ago – WDR 1987 Industrialization and Foreign Trade. In the meantime:

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Healthy people drive strong economies

Dieynaba Nioula Kane remembers vividly when, for the first time in her life, she was kg_blogforced to ask friends and family for money. It was out of desperation after the birth of her fifth child, a little boy with a life-threatening condition that needed specialist treatment in the capital. Dieynaba was forced to leave her job teaching French and hurriedly relocate to Dakar, where she was able to find the health services he needed.

But the expenses quickly piled up. Hospital bills, a tracheostomy, medicines, dressings, fees for nurses and doctors, plus the cost of food and transportation to and from the hospital. As she took a break from paid employment for four years to focus on her son’s health her family’s economic conditions deteriorated. It took the family years to recover.

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