The ticket to a better ride: How can Automated Fare Collection improve urban transport?

In both developed and developing countries, a growing number of cities are relying on fr-navigo-pass-paris-emily-jackson-flickr_0automated systems to collect public transport fares and verify payment. Far from being a gimmick, Automated Fare Collection (AFC) can bring a wide range of benefits to local governments, transport planners, operators—and, of course, to commuters themselves.

The recent Transforming Transportation 2019 conference paid a great deal of attention to the applications and benefits of AFC, which have been at the heart of many World Bank and IFC-supported urban mobility projects.

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Innovations in satellite measurements for development

Combinatorial innovation is driving innovation in satellite-based economic 1*RyJ8BUGJ-wjbiQzjUiOASwmeasurements at unprecedented resolution, frequency and scale. Increasing availability of satellite data and rapid advancements in machine learning methods are enabling a better understanding into the fundamental forces shaping economic development.

Why satellite data innovations matter

The desire of human beings to “think spatially” to understand how people and objects are organized in space has not changed much since Eratosthenes — the Greek astronomer best known as the “father of Geography” — first used the term “Geographika” around 250 BC. Centuries later, our understanding of economic geography is being propelled forward by new data and new capabilities to rapidly process, analyze and convert these vast data flows into meaningful and near real-time information

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Annual Bank Conference on Development Economics 2019 Multilateralism: Past, Present, and Future

The Annual Bank Conference on Development Economics (ABCDE), organized by the archived-image-Bretton-Woods-Conference.jpg World Bank’s Development Economics (DEC) Vice Presidency, is one of the world’s best-known series of conferences for the presentation and discussion of new knowledge on development. The conference aims to promote the exchange of cutting-edge knowledge among researchers, policymakers, and development practitioners.

The next conference will take place on June 17–18, 2019 at World Bank Headquarters in Washington, D.C. The theme of the conference will be “Multilateralism: Past, Present, and Future”. The 2019 ABCDE conference will be part of a series of events scheduled to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Bretton Woods conference.

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This is What it’s All About: Protecting Biodiversity in Africa

This story is part of a series that will run ahead of the third edition of the One Planet untitledSummit which will take place in Nairobi, Kenya, on March 14, 2019. The Summit brings together global leaders, entrepreneurs, international organizations, and civil society, to help accelerate and focus attention on climate investments in line with the Paris Agreement objectives. The Summit will focus on promoting renewable energies, fostering resilience and adaptation and protecting biodiversity in Africa. Follow #OnePlanetSummit for live updates and tune in live on March 14.

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Setting up early warning and response systems to prevent violent conflicts and save lives

As highlighted in the UN-World Bank report Pathways for Peace: Inclusive Approaches to guineaPreventing Violent Conflict, the number of violent conflicts has increased since 2010, thus raising the question of how violence and its escalation can be prevented. Conflict prevention mechanisms exist. Let’s take a look at Early Warning and Response Systems (EWRS), but first, what is early warning and early response?

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Scaling up innovations in agriculture: Lessons from Africa

For too long the narrative surrounding Africa’s agri-food sector has been one of limited scaling-up-innovations-in-agriculture-lessons-from-africa-780x439.jpgopportunity, flat yields and small farms. It’s true that Africa is still producing too little food and value-added products despite recent efforts to increase investment, and that agricultural productivity has been broadly stagnant since the 1980s as shown in the 2018 African Agriculture Status Report.

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Data for development impact: Why we need to invest in data, people and ideas

High quality development data is a must for development impact shutterstock_1109960660

We know that high quality development data is the foundation for meaningful policy-making, efficient resource allocation, and effective public service delivery. Unfortunately, even as new technology makes more data and wider uses of data possible, there are still many blank spaces on the global data map. A paper by my colleague Umar Serajuddin et al. (2015) describes this phenomenon as “data deprivation”, finding that as of just a few years ago, 77 countries still lacked the data needed to adequately measure poverty. What’s worse, data is often most scarce in the areas where it is most desperately needed. For one, the scarcity of individual-level data on issues like assets and consumption severely curtails our ability to make decisions to reduce gender disparities. Similarly, despite the urgency of the need to manage climate risk, significant voids remain with regards to climate data, such as impacts on freshwater resources. Education, health, food security, and infrastructure are just a few of the many other areas where more and better data is needed to deliver progress.

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Social media beyond entertainment

Social media has flourished with increasing digital connectivity. Internet users in the 1_pCKhN6mVHMVYwmYo8HE-DgPhilippines, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and the United Arab Emirates spend more than 3 hours per day on social media. Global social media platforms such as YouTube and WhatsApp as well as local ones such as Mxit, an instant messaging application in South Africa, and Odnoklassniki, the Russian version of Facebook, are attracting people’s attention. The social interaction aspect of those communication initiatives redefines how individuals, business and government engage with each other.

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How crowdsourcing can improve food safety

Unsafe foods cost developing economies over $110 billion in lost productivity and food-poisoning-collagemedical expenses each year, according to the World Bank’s own figures. And yet in many cases surveillance is limited, and there are few effective ways for a consumer to report a case of food poisoning.

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WDR 2020: Sneak preview

The next World Development Report (WDR) on Global Value Chains: Trading for untitledDevelopment is well under way. Check out our website for a sneak preview.

Since the Bank’s last report more than thirty years ago on Industrialization and Foreign Trade, the world has been transformed, mostly in positive terms from a development perspective. Several low and middle income countries can now participate globally thanks to global value chains (GVCs).

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