Our children’s planet: What does their education have to do with climate change?

Our world is very different than our grandparent’s. In 1950, there were about 2.5 billion 1_dshzzz8-5ywxq6sjduincwpeople; today, there are more than 7 billion. Overall, people are healthier, wealthier, and more secure.

But this has come at a cost. The stress on our planet has been immense. Human beings have dramatically altered the climate, changed the chemistry of the oceans, and triggered mass extinctions. The impact has been so great as to define an entirely new geological era — the Anthropocene, turbo charged by a “great acceleration” of population, economic growth and natural resource consumption since the 1950s.

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eC2: Forced Displacement and Education: Building the Evidence for What Works

Deadline: 17-Dec-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The research is expected (i) to collect evidence about promising practices in providing untitledaccess to education and improving learning outcomes for the forcibly displaced and affected host communities (ii) to improve our effectiveness to facilitate the transition and uptake from humanitarian education responses to long-term solutions for sustainable access to quality education for the forcibly displaced. The TORs aims to select an agency with extensive experience in practical, empirically grounded and field-based research as well as operation in education policy preferably in forced displacement context to conduct research on
1) What is the available evidence of the impact, cost, and replicability of education interventions that facilitate the access and retention of displaced students and out of school youth?
2) How can education systems be strengthened to become inclusive and resilient to expand and deliver education services to both displaced and host children and youth?

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Tackling gender inequality through investments in health equity

Still today, in almost all societies around the world, women are less well-off than men.democratic-republic-congo_final_edit_0029.jpg Women are still paid less than men; they are less represented in business, politics and decision-making. Their life chances remain overwhelmingly less promising than those of men.

This inequality hurts us all. The world would be 20% better off if women were paid the same as men. Delaying early marriage in the developing world by just a few years would add more than $500 billion to annual global economic output by 2030.

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eC2: DEVELOPMENT OF TRAINING MANUAL AND E-LEARNING SYSTEM FOR GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Deadline: 28-Nov-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)Financial Education

The World Bank seeks to contract a consultancy firm to develop a training manual for the Government Performance Management System in Bangladesh. The training manual will be in Bangla and English. Also an e-learning platform will be developed to complement the training manual. It is desired that the interested firms have experience of working with the Government Performance Management System and development of the training systems to be used both for face to face training as well as self-administered online/ virtual training. The assignment requires for interested firms to have team members with experience in the development of training materials for the government and e-learning modules. A strong network in Bangladesh, and partnership with public sector institutions in developing the training systems would be advantageous for the qualified firms. The firms should have the capacity to identify national experts with profound understanding of the Government Performance Management System as well as the public administration system in Bangladesh.

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4 education trends countries everywhere should know about

Recently, we reached out to education experts around the world to hear what they 1*GbKJhx3WvZlagJ7f_7ZEfQconsidered the most pressing issues facing our sector today. Surprisingly, they all said that little has changed in terms of our most common challenges. What was changing, they agreed, were the innovative ways that the global community has begun tackling them.

Our discussions frequently came back to advances in neuroscience, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), Blockchain, and the consequences of negative population growth — as well as the ways that these phenomena are changing and challenging the way we think about education. Some of these changes have received more attention than others, but we are convinced of their importance — and education stakeholders around the world should be paying attention.

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Investing in People to Build Human Capital

Scientific and technological advances are transforming lives: they are even helping investing-in-people2poorer countries close the gap with rich countries in life expectancy. But, poorer countries still face tremendous challenges, as almost a quarter of children under five are malnourished, and 60 percent of primary school students are failing to achieve even a rudimentary education. In fact, more than 260 million children and youth in poorer countries are receiving no education at all.

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Investing in People to Build Human Capital

Scientific and technological advances are transforming lives: they are even helping investing-in-people2poorer countries close the gap with rich countries in life expectancy. But, poorer countries still face tremendous challenges, as almost a quarter of children under five are malnourished, and 60 percent of primary school students are failing to achieve even a rudimentary education. In fact, more than 260 million children and youth in poorer countries are receiving no education at all.

There is a moral case to be made, of course, for investing in the health and education of all people.  But there is an economic one as well: to be ready to compete and thrive in a rapidly changing environment. “Human capital” – the potential of individuals – is going to be the most important long-term investment any country can make for its people’s future prosperity and quality of life.

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Missed Opportunities: The High Cost of Not Educating Girls

Globally 89% of girls complete primary education, but only 77% complete lower cost_girl_educationsecondary education, which in most countries is 9 years of schooling. In low income countries, the numbers drop to below 2/3 for primary education, and only 1/3 for lower secondary school.

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Are men the new weaker sex? The rise of the reverse gender gap in education

capture1_34It is probably fair to say that the World Bank’s latest report on intergenerational mobility – Fair Progress? Economic Mobility across Generations around the World – is the first-ever attempt to paint a truly global picture of how achievement – or the lack thereof – is transmitted across generations. Though there are results for income mobility for a subset of countries, most of the analysis focuses on educational attainment across 148 economies, representing over 95% of the world’s population.

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The Missing Piece: Disability-Inclusive Education

down-syndrome-boy-with-phoneIn 2015, the world committed to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.” More than an inspirational target, SDG4 is integral to the well-being of our societies and economies – to the quality of life of all individuals.

Today, 65 million primary school-age children are not in school – close to half of them are children with disabilities. Even children with disabilities who do enroll are far less likely to complete school than others. Some estimates suggest that less than 5% of children with disabilities will graduate. This has led to a world where only 3% of adults with disabilities are literate – with, shockingly, only 1% of women with disabilities being literate.

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