Recap Spring Meeting Events

REPLAYS

In his speech at the Warsaw School of Economics ahead of the 2022 Spring Meetings, titled “Addressing Challenges to Growth, Security, and Stability,” World Bank Group President David Malpass discussed the millions who are suffering amid massive reversals in development and outlined actions the global community can take to help address this situation. Read the full speech here, which was broadcast live from Poland, a country that has taken in over 2.3 million Ukrainian refugees fleeing war.

April 19 | 11:30 AM EDT 

The Way Forward: 

Responding to Global Shocks and Managing Uncertainty

Responding to Global Shocks and Managing Uncertainty
IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva and World Bank Group President David Malpass kicked off the 2022 Spring Meetings, emphasizing the need for increased debt transparency when debt levels are already high, and urged advanced economies to adjust their policies and improve access to markets, especially during the current food crisis. They also highlighted the immediate response both institutions are providing Ukraine and also discussed how to support the rebuilding of the country. #ResilientFuture
 
World Bank Group President David Malpass addressed the press during the International Monetary Fund and World Bank Group 2022 Spring Meetings. He provided updates on the Bank Group’s efforts to respond to myriad crises around the world, as well as to help developing countries manage uncertainty and deliver green, resilient and inclusive development. #ResilientFuture
As developing countries struggle to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, digital solutions are enabling economic transformation and putting them on a path toward green, resilient, and inclusive growth. Private and public investment in digital solutions is bringing critical services to the poorest, creating jobs, strengthening small and medium businesses, enabling trade and services, and building resilience to shocks. Catch our replay and learn more. #PowerofDigital
 

April 21 | 11:00 AM EDT 

Financing Climate Action
 
Financing Climate Action lays out the complexities of tackling climate and development objectives together amid a geopolitical landscape characterized by conflict, rising prices, and intensifying climate impacts. Several pressing issues are addressed in a series of conversations, from the cost of phasing out coal and the scale of the climate risk we face, to the need to de-risk investments in low-carbon and energy efficiency projects in developing countries, and the expectations for COP27 in Egypt.  #Finance4Climate
 

Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky joined this roundtable discussion with the World Bank Group via video link from Ukraine. He spoke about the enormous humanitarian and economic costs of the Russian invasion on Ukraine – including the widespread destruction of schools, nurseries and universities. The World Bank Group estimates the Russian invasion has caused almost $60 billion in physical damage to buildings and infrastructure. The event was hosted by the World Bank Group and the Government of Ukraine.

 

April 22 | 12:00 PM EDT

On the Frontlines of Rising Fragility

By 2030, up to two-thirds of the world’s extreme poor could live in fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV) settings, so without addressing the challenges in these economies, we will not succeed in our mission to eradicate extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity. During this event, we heard from David Malpass, President of the World Bank Group, as well as partners and country representatives on how to stay engaged during times of crisis and meet the challenges in new and innovative ways. #RisingFragility

 

April 22 | 2:30 PM EDT

Preserving Open Trade

At a time when the global economy is coping with multiple shocks, including the pandemic, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and supply chain disruptions to food and other goods, governments are increasingly turning to subsidies for relief. But the costs can be very high, in terms of public spending and distorted incentives for investment and consumption. In this event, the heads of the four key global economic policy institutions—the World Bank Group, the IMF, the OECD and the WTO—discussed the importance of trade and global cooperation for overcoming current challenges and implications of subsidies for markets and poor countries.  #UnleashTrade

 

April 23 | 11:00 AM EDT

Invest in People

Now–more than at any other time in living memory–human capital is being dealt devastating blows by conflict, climate change, and the COVID-19 pandemic. The losses to learning, health outcomes, livelihoods, and gender equality have immediate and long-term impacts on people’s well-being and can undermine economic recovery and prosperity for years. Listen to leaders, innovators and change makers who are taking action to put people at the heart of recovery. #InvestInPeople

 
 

The 2022 World Bank Group Spring Meetings: Strengthening the case for globalism

In October, 2021, leaders from governments met at the IMF/World Bank Annual meetings to discuss the uneven recovery the global economy was experiencing, develop solutions to ramping up the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and explore ways to ensure that all countries can participate in a green, resilient, and inclusive return to stability and growth.

Continue reading

Getting it right on development: We do not have to choose between people and climate

There is no doubt that climate change is profoundly unjust.  The world’s poorest countries did cif_south_africa_50268208563_6a25241b63_o_1the least to contribute to global emissions historically and poorer people within countries emit less than their rich neighbors. Nonetheless, poorer countries and poorer people are more vulnerable to climate impacts. They tend to be more exposed to climate change impacts, for instance living in places exposed to floods, working in occupations like agriculture, or lacking access to improved water and sanitation. And they have fewer resources to adapt and invest in protecting themselves.  

Continue reading

We are losing a generation: The devastating impacts of COVID-19

Governments across the globe will spend about $5 trillion on K-12 education this year.  Butindermit_leadunless they get all children and young people back to school, keep them in class, and recover the central elements of learning, this generation could lose twice or three times that amount in earning losses.

The first impact was the millions of lives lost due to the disease caused by the COVID 19 virus. The second was the human suffering caused by job instability and poverty. The third is on children and youth who should have been in school but were told to stay at home.

Continue reading

Reversing the pandemic’s education losses

When schools around the world moved online due to COVID-19, children in developing countries suffered the most. Even though digital learning does not produce the same outcomes as in-person education, technology used effectively can close educational gaps and prevent learning loss.

Continue reading

How to use technology to help teachers be better and to make life better for teachers

Teachers matter enormously to student learning. Teachers deliver academic knowledge. d_evans_blogTeachers impart model socioemotional skills. Good teachers boost students’ long-term life outcomes. Teachers can inspire (and in another demonstration of their importance, in some cases, sadly, teachers can disappoint or even abuse). 

Continue reading

India: Rural women go digital to manage the pandemic’s disruptions

 

Muskanben Vohara and her group of women weavers in Gujarat’s Anand district were women-artisans-members-from-barara-village-of-patan-districts-doing-traditional-painting-on-cloth-to-prepare-for-embroidery-for-sewa-hansiba-product._overcome with worry when the lockdown was announced to contain the Covid-19 pandemic.

Matching climate change ambition with collective action

Despite contributing the least to the climate crisis, Sub-Saharan Africa, home to over 1 billion matching-climate-change-ambition-collective-action-1140x500people, continues to suffer some of the worst consequences of a changing climate. In 2019, we saw the catastrophic impacts of Cyclone Idai on millions of people in Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi, and in 2020, locusts caused widespread food insecurity in the amidst of a global pandemic.

Continue reading

COVID-19 spurs big changes in Pakistan’s education

 

worldbank_teleschool_artwork_-_copyPakistan’s schools are reopening again today after a nearly uninterrupted 11-month hiatus.  In March 2020, the Government of Pakistan closed all schools as part of a nationwide lockdown, prompting the Ministry of Federal Education and Professional Training (MoFE&PT) to seek education alternatives to ensure learning continuity.

Continue reading