eC2: Creating Market Opportunities for Women Small and Medium Enterprises in Bangladesh- Corporate Engagement and Networking

Deadline: 04-Nov-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) woman

The objective of the assignment is to initiate the corporate engagement and awareness strategy through facilitating a high level conference to bringing together support organizations, WSMEs, Corporations, financial institutes and policy makers to created awareness and facilitate market opportunities.

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Meet 3 young leaders tackling youth unemployment

Globally, unemployment is hitting young people the hardest. The ILO estimates that insider7-2_002youth unemployment rates are 300 percent higher than unemployment rates for adults over 25 years old, and higher than unemployment among any other age group. To add to this, many youth are also not enrolled in education or training.

But young people are not standing by and waiting for opportunities to come their way. Many of them are actively engaged in tackling the challenge—not just for themselves but for youth in their communities too.

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New Findex notes showcase digital financial inclusion in Sub-Saharan Africa

We’re thrilled to release five new data notes in collaboration with the International 2019-Findex01Finance Corporation and Mastercard Foundation Partnership for Financial Inclusion outlining Sub-Saharan Africa’s successes and challenges in building digital financial inclusion. The notes—all of which are available for download at our homepage—draw on tens of thousands of surveys to explore how adults in the region use accounts, digital payments, and savings to manage their financial lives.

Sub-Saharan Africa leads one of the most exciting development innovations of our time—the rise of mobile money. Our first note explains how this technology can expand the use of financial services and describes how it has spread over time.

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eC2: Advisory of Sustainable and Smart Cities Solutions in LAC

Deadline: 20-Jul-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) Smart-Cities-All-you-need-to-know

The objective of this consultancy is two-fold. Prepare a pre-feasibility study to explore electric bus and other technological solutions and alternatives for the cities of Cali, Colombia and San Jose, Costa Rica in order to reduce the GHG emission of the transport sector of the cities. In addition, assist the cities to implement EDGE certification pilots for sustainable buildings.

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Money sent home by workers now largest source of external financing in low- and middle-income countries (excluding China)

Article by Donna Barne & Florina Pirlea| www.worldbank.org.

The money workers send home to their families from abroad has become a critical part of many economies around the world. Based on the most recent data, remittances, as this money is called, will only grow in importance. Officially recorded remittances amounted to a record $529 billion in 2018, and are on track to reach $550 billion in 2019.

This money is flowing at about the same levels as foreign direct investment (FDI), but if China is excluded, they are the largest source of foreign exchange earnings in low- and middle-income countries, according to Migration and Remittances Brief 31, published by the World Bank Group and KNOMAD, the Global Knowledge Partnership on Migration and Development. In other words, if China is excluded from the analysis, remittances have already overtaken FDI as the biggest source of external financing.

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Lifelines for Better Development

STORY HIGHLIGHTS Image

  • Resilient infrastructure is about people. Particularly in developing countries, infrastructure disruptions are an everyday concern that affects people’s well-being, economic prospects, and quality of life.
  • There is a significant economic opportunity from investing in resilient infrastructure: the overall net benefit of doing so in developing countries would be $4.2 trillion over the lifetime of new infrastructure.
  • For infrastructure investors, governments, development banks and the private sector the message is clear: rather than just spending more, also spend better

World Refugee Day 2019: Building a stronger international response to the challenge of forced displacement

This year, World Refugee Day finds me in Addis Ababa with representatives from more ethiopia-for-blogthan 50 governments to review the work of the International Development Association (IDA), the arm of the World Bank Group that provides financing to the poorest countries, and discuss priorities for the years ahead. Under its current program, IDA is providing $2 billion to 14 low-income countries which together are hosting 6.4 million refugees, including in Ethiopia. 

Ethiopia is among the countries that is taking major steps forward. Here, for example, we have supported the government in adopting a new legal framework for refugees which will allow them to gradually move out of camps, find jobs, and access education and health services. This is no small measure for the more than 900,000 refugees who are hosted along Ethiopia’s borders with Somalia, Eritrea, Sudan, and South Sudan. It is the difference between having a chance to restart their lives or be condemned to dependency and destitution.

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Lifelines for Better Development

Published on http://www.worldbank.org, June 19, 2019

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Resilient infrastructure is about people. Particularly in developing countries, Lifelines22--1-infrastructure disruptions are an everyday concern that affects people’s well-being, economic prospects, and quality of life.
  • There is a significant economic opportunity from investing in resilient infrastructure: the overall net benefit of doing so in developing countries would be $4.2 trillion over the lifetime of new infrastructure.
  • For infrastructure investors, governments, development banks and the private sector the message is clear: rather than just spending more, also spend better

Infrastructure is at the heart of lives and livelihoods. It can enable schools and hospitals, businesses and industry, and access to jobs and prosperity. In developing countries, however, disruptions to infrastructure are an everyday concern, reducing opportunities for employment, hampering health and education, and limiting economic growth.

In low and middle-income countries, direct damages from natural hazards to power generation and transport alone cost $18 billion a year, cutting into the already scarce budget of road agencies and power utilities. But the main impact of natural shocks on infrastructure is through the disruptions they impose on people and communities, for instance, businesses unable to keep factories running or use the internet to take orders and process payments; or on the households that don’t have the water they need to prepare meals or on people unable to go to work, send children to school, or get to a hospital.

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A private-sector role in managing land administration? We did our homework

In this blog space in October 2017, we discussed the role of private sector in land administration and mentioned our unit would undertake an assessment and conduct landmanagementglobal consultations on the issue. Our idea was to discuss current experience and explore ways to enhance this kind of partnership.

Last month in Vienna, we completed the third consultation where 40-some participants joined us—split equally between government and private sector representatives. This followed two consultations held in Dubai last October and Kuala Lumpur in February.

Our consultations addressed several questions:

•    What models of PPP in land administration should be considered?
•    What are their minimum requirements?
•    What risks are involved and how can they be mitigated?

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In Small Island States, Resilient Transport is Providing a Lifeline Against Disasters

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Due to their size and location, Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are particularlyA man stands next to a bridge on the East Cape Road. The East Ca vulnerable to climate risk.
  • When disaster strikes, damage to transport systems typically makes up a large share of overall losses, and is often one of the main obstacles to recovery.
  • The World Bank is answering the call with unprecedented support to the transport sector in small island states. A total of eight transport projects have been approved in SIDS over the last year, all of which include a resilience component.

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