Food and Security Update

AT A GLANCE
The agricultural, cereal, and export price indices were stable over the past 2 weeks.

Domestic food price inflation remains high around the world. High inflation continues in almost all low
income and middleincome countries, and the share of highincome countries with high inflation is also
increasing sharply.

Russia and Ukraine signed an agreement to free more than 20 million tonnes of grain stuck in Ukraine’s Black
Sea ports.

The war in Ukraine threatens poor countries with overlapping food and debt crises.

The Horn of Africa is suffering its worst drought in more than 40 years.

FULL REPORT

 

 

Job: Junior Professional Associate

Junior Professional Associate

Job #: req12469
Organization: World Bank
Grade: Ungraded
Term Duration:  2 years 0 months
Recruitment Type: Local Recruitment
Location: Global based on business need
Required Language(s): English

Description

Junior Professional Associates – Program Description

The Junior Professional Associate (JPA) program is a unique opportunity to gain entry-level professional experience and first-hand exposure to the challenges – and rewards – of international development. 

 
Are you a recent graduate? Do you have passion for and commitment to helping others? Are you looking for a solid, two-year entry-level work experience in a multicultural environment? If so, you may be interested in the the World Bank’s JPA program.
 
 
In your JPA assignment, you’ll use your strong quantitative and qualitative analytical skills, your knowledge of technology and your research abilities – working with more senior colleagues and project teams in their work both in operations and in corporate functions. You’ll have an opportunity to hone your skills and acquire new ones while gaining first-hand exposure to the challenges of reducing poverty and boosting shared prosperity. Your experience as a JPA may be used as a steppingstone to a career in government, consulting, the private sector, academia or other development agencies.
 
 
What are we looking for?
 
 
Your academic achievements are superior and place you in the top portion of your graduating class. Your analytical and research skills extend to areas of specialization such as: economics, finance, human development (public health, education, nutrition, population), social sciences (anthropology, sociology), agriculture, environment (climate, blue economy), infrastructure, private sector development, as well as other related fields, including corporate and administrative functions (IT, legal, accounting, communications, etc.).

You are fluent in English and, preferably, in at least one other Bank language (French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Portuguese, or Chinese). You love technology and integrate it in your work.

 
What are we offering you?
 
 
We will provide you with the opportunity to gain entry-level professional experience in a premier development institution, on a two-year, non-renewable Extended Term Consultant (ETC) contract with benefits.
 
 
Eligibility Criteria
 
 
The following are minimum requirements to be eligible for the JPA program: 

     – Be 28 years of age or younger on your first day of service

     – Hold the equivalent of a Bachelor’s degree with a superior academic record

     – Be fluent in English

     – One or more of the Bank’s working languages is a plus: Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish 

 
Since this employment program is highly competitive, applicants under active consideration for employment may be asked to submit academic records as well as references. The World Bank will contact only those applicants whom hiring managers wish to interview.
 
 
Positions may be located in any of the World Bank’s offices across the world.
 
 
A JPA assignment is not an entry point for a career at the World Bank and employment beyond the two-year contract will be prohibited for a period of two years after the end of the contract. However, some former JPAs may rejoin the organization later in their careers after gaining experience elsewhere and becoming experts in their professional fields.
 
 
Recruitment and hiring for this employment category is ongoing throughout the year.
 
 
How do I apply?
 
 
Interested candidates may apply online. (Please take care to provide required information where indicated). Please note that applications will be kept active in our database for a period of six months. Should you still be interested in JPA program after six months, you will need to re-apply. Only those identified for an assignment will be contacted to discuss their interest and availability. Candidates are selected by the hiring manager on a highly competitive basis.
 
 
The World Bank continually searches for qualified individuals with a diverse set of backgrounds from around the globe. We are proud to be an equal opportunity and inclusive employer with a dedicated and committed workforce, and do not discriminate based on gender, gender identity, religion, race, color, ethnicity, sexual orientation or disability.
 
 
Individuals with disabilities may be provided reasonable accommodations to perform essential functions and support in receiving other workplace accommodations. Please contact the Disability Accommodation Fund at disabilityfund@worldbank.org for further information and support.

Poverty has no borders, neither does excellence. We succeed because of our differences and we continuously search for qualified individuals with diverse backgrounds from around the globe.

 

 

 

Long before the asphalt is laid, making sure roads work for everyone

Roads are fundamental to economies and social well-being. They connect people with Meghalayatopopportunities and everyday essentials. But despite their essential nature, one billion people globally still live more than 2 kilometers from an all-season road. The need for roads is immense and building them requires strategic planning. 

Long before the asphalt is actually laid, the right choices need to be made regarding road construction. One tool that helps authorities make critical decisions is The Highway Design and Maintenance Standards Model (HDM), a software package developed by the World Bank and partners that is as important to road projects as asphalt or medians. 

Continue reading

World Bank Scales Up its Financing for Food Security with Additional $315 Million to Strengthen the Resilience of Food Systems across West Africa

WASHINGTON, July 29, 2022 – Some additional 2 million people will benefit from a second ghana-food-securityphase of the West Africa regional Food Systems Resilience Program (FSRP-2) approved today for a total amount of $315 million in International Development Association (IDA*) financing. FSRP-2 will support Chad, Ghana and Sierra Leone to increase their preparedness against food insecurity and to improve the resilience of their food systems. This comes at a moment where it is projected that approximately 38.3 million people in West Africa are projected to be in food security crisis.

Continue reading

World Bank Group Outlines Global Crisis Response Package to Help Developing Countries Navigate Multiple, Compounding Crises

WASHINGTON, August 3, 2022 – The World Bank Group (WBG) today announced details of its global crisis response package to help developing countries navigate multiple, compounding crises that are hitting the poor and most vulnerable the hardest.

“Multiple crises – including rising inflation, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, large macroeconomic imbalances, and the shortages of energy, fertilizer and food – are hammering developing countries” said World Bank Group President David Malpass. “The World Bank Group is responding with speed, scale and impact with financing to respond to food insecurity, protect people, preserve jobs, strengthen resilience, and restore growth.”

Continue reading

How to manage the world’s fertilizers to avoid a prolonged food crisis

Hidden behind the worst global food crisis in a decade, fertilizer prices have skyrocketedag_blog_july_22_1140x500_1117767635_9d624e5836_o and remain volatile . This poses a serious threat to food security, as the planting season starts this summer. So far, the war in Ukraine has mostly affected countries importing wheat and corn. But many countries, including some major food exporters, are net fertilizer importers. Persistently high fertilizer prices may spread to a broader variety of crops including rice, a staple which has not yet seen war-related price hikes. We must act now to make fertilizers more accessible and affordable to avoid prolonging the food crisis.   

Continue reading

eC2: Consultancy services to Deliver a Gender Capacity Building [ToT] to a team of agronomists in Uganda and Zimbabwe

Deadline: scaling-up-innovations-in-agriculture-lessons-from-africa-780x43908-Aug-2022 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

IFC is seeking a firm to support an advisory project in the Rwenzori region of Uganda that will complement an IFC investment transaction. The advisory project will support smallholder farmers to improve coffee production and productivity through the sustained adoption and application of good agronomic practices and enable the Client and its partners to improve the sourcing capacity of high-quality coffee. IFC is therefore seeking a vendor firm to deliver a gender capacity building program [Training of Trainers] to a team of agronomists/field in each of the origin using a transformative change methodology. The training on the gender transformative approach will be delivered by a vendor firm and will target:
up to 23 trainees in Uganda
up to 7 trainees in Zimbabwe

Continue reading

eC2: Technical Assistance Program on Cambodia Sustainable Cities Initiative

Deadline: 04-Aug-2022 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)sust-cities-banner-940x240

The World Bank is providing technical assistance to Cambodias Ministry of Land Management, Urban Planning and Construction (MLMUPC) and Phnom Penh Capital Authority (PPCA) to conduct the Phnom Penh Capital City Diagnostic aimed at updating the Phnom Penh Green City Strategic Plan (the Strategic Plan). The Strategic Plan will identify opportunities for low-carbon and resilient development under climate change. The project is funded by the City Climate Finance Gap Fund, which aims to help cities in low- and middle-income countries transition towards low-carbon and climate-resilient pathways in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement.

Continue reading

Aiding the digital revolution in global financial inclusion

“Expanding people’s access to finance, reducing the cost of digital transactions, and channeling wage payments and social transfers through financial accounts will be vital to mitigating recent economic setbacks in developing countries. Governments and the private sector can help further this transformation in several ways.”


Around the world, high inflation, slow economic growth, and food shortages are hurting the poor the most. Coming on top of the unequal effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, today’s multiple crises have already caused dramatic reversals in development and led to a substantial increase in global poverty.

On the positive side, the COVID-19 crisis spurred unprecedented change, especially in industries with a large digital component . This digital revolution has catalyzed increases in access to and use of financial services in developing economies, transforming how people make and receive payments, borrow, and save. 

These changes are strikingly evident in the latest edition of the Global Findex database, compiled from a survey of more than 125,000 adults in 123 economies, covering use of financial services throughout 2021. The survey found that 71% of adults in developing economies now have a formal financial account – whether with a bank, another regulated institution such as a credit union or microfinance lender, or a mobile money service provider – compared to 42% when the first edition of the database was published a decade ago. In addition, the difference in the share of men and women in developing economies who own an account has fallen for the first time, from nine percentage points to six. 

This digital transformation makes it easier, cheaper, and safer for people to receive wages from employers, send remittances to family members, and pay for goods and services. Mobile money accounts can better handle high-volume, small-denomination transactions, which help users to access financial services and save in order to cope better with crises. Individual accounts also give women more privacy, security, and control over their money.

The share of adults in developing economies who make or receive digital payments grew from 35% in 2014 to 57% in 2021 . In Sub-Saharan Africa, 39% of mobile money account holders now use their accounts to save. And more than one-third of people in low- and middle-income countries who paid a utility bill from an account did so for the first time after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Importantly, the digital revolution also serves as a powerful anti-corruption tool, because it helps to increase transparency as money flows from a government’s budget to public agencies to citizens . Government social programs can now reduce delays and leakage by channeling transfers directly to their beneficiaries’ mobile phones. Millions of people in developing countries received payments in this way during the pandemic, helping to cushion the impact of COVID-19 on livelihoods.

Building on these encouraging trends is crucial, especially given the current economic headwinds. Expanding people’s access to finance, reducing the cost of digital transactions, and channeling wage payments and social transfers through financial accounts will be vital to mitigating development setbacks resulting from the ongoing turbulence.

Governments and the private sector can help further this transformation in several critical areas. First, they need to create a favorable operating and policy environment. For example, enabling the interoperability of systems allows for payments across different types of financial institutions and between mobile money service providers. Improving access to finance depends much more on the mobile-phone system than on the physical banking system. Cheap and functional mobile phones and affordable internet access are prerequisites for expanding digital finance. Consumer protections and stable regulations are also needed to foster safe and fair practices that bolster trust in the financial system.

Establishing digital-identification systems also is essential, because lack of verifiable identity is one of the main reasons why some adults remain excluded from financial services . We know from the experiences of countries such as India and the Philippines that government identification programs and financial-inclusion programs can work in tandem to equip hard-to-reach populations with official identification documents and financial accounts. India, for example, has pioneered a successful accessible digital ID system that pays due attention to safety and privacy.

Another high priority should be to promote the digitalization of payments. The Global Findex data for 2021 show that 865 million account owners in developing economies opened their first account at a bank or similar institution in order to receive money from the government. This helped households directly and also helped build the digital financial ecosystem, because people who received payments into an account were more likely to use their account to make payments and access other services. Digital payments by governments thus serve as a foundation for assembling credible social registers and identifying gaps and overlaps.

As digital payments become more widespread and less costly, many private businesses will be able to pay their workers and suppliers electronically – and should. The digital revolution offers a chance to increase formal-sector employment without making compliance excessively burdensome. At a time of tighter government budget constraints, digital payments can help broaden the revenue base by reducing tax avoidance and evasion.

Finally, policymakers will need to make additional efforts to include underserved groups. The gender gap in financial access has narrowed, but it still exists. Women, along with the poor, are more likely to lack a form of personal identification or a mobile phone, to live far from a bank branch , and to need support to open and use a financial account. Financial-education programs, especially those that involve peer-to-peer learning (such as through women’s self-help groups) are essential as well.

The World Bank is firmly committed to expanding financial inclusion through digitalization. We will continue to support countries as they enhance mobile-phone networks, rework regulations to foster access to finance, adopt e-government platforms, and modernize social-protection systems. For the many millions of people who still lack an account, we need to redouble our efforts and find creative ways to connect them to the financial system, build economic resilience, and reap the benefits of inclusion.


This piece was originally published by Project Syndicate on July 7, 2022