Making a better poverty map

The digital economy is transforming how data is collected, processed and used for poverty%20map%20hand%20drawn_Page_3.pngevidence-based decisions to monitor and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Promising new methods that combine traditional household survey data with non-traditional data sources (such as mobile phone data, satellite data and text data) are creating opportunities to map poverty at a higher resolution and scale. Nonetheless, significant technical, practical and ethical challenges still hamper the operationalization of these methods.

“The careful combination of ground truth surveys with an abundance of big data increases—not decreases—the value of surveys.”
Marshall Burke

eC2: Agricultural Technologies and Supply Chain Innovations (AgTech) Project. Use Case 2: Digitally Enhanced Agricultural Extension Service Delivery

Deadline: 29-Jul-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)agriculture-youth

IFC is seeking to introduce IT based solutions that help its agribusiness clients to increase the number of farmers they reach cost-effectively with consistent extension messages. IFC intends to contract a Consulting Firm who will use communication technologies to deliver standard and localized extension messages to Smallholder Farmers (SHFs) and agents participating in the AgTech project. This approach primarily entails the use of digital tools to deliver extension trainings and to receive feedback from trainees, thereby improving service and the quality of information delivered to SHFs. The required digital solution would be the use of videos integrating other communication channels, such as radio, mobile applications, SMS, and interactive voice response for the delivery of localized and consistent extension messages to SHFs/ agents.
Continue reading

Understanding the “new rurality” in Latin America and what it means to the water and sanitation sector

Despite the urbanization trends seen in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC), it seems 23845439171_fb7b1102e1_othat the rural population in LAC is decreasing in relative terms. In 2001, official figures indicated that 125 million people in LAC resided in rural areas representing 24% of the total LAC population. In 2013, this value decreased to 21% (130 million out of a total population of 609 million inhabitants), and it is estimated that by 2030, the rural population will decrease to represent 16.5% of the total (CEPAL, 2014).

Continue reading

New country classifications by income level: 2019-2020

Updated country income classifications for the World Bank’s 2020 fiscal year are available World Bank buildinghere.

The World Bank classifies the world’s economies into four income groups — high, upper-middle, lower-middle, and low. We base this assignment on Gross National Income (GNI) per capita (current US$) calculated using the Atlas method. The classification is updated each year on July 1st.

Continue reading

eC2: Diagnostic study on marine litter prevention, especially relating to plastics, in coastal

Deadline: 01-Aug-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) eu-plastic-regels-2019

The World Bank is looking to recruit a consultancy firm to carry out a diagnostic study on marine pollution/plastic debris prevention in coastal Kenya. The consultancy has the following objectives:

Continue reading

Harnessing the power of data so no child is left behind

Data plays a crucial role in the 2030 agenda set out by the Sustainable Development grid_titleGoals (SDGs). It helps us to focus policies and make better decisions. It is needed to set targets, measure progress towards those targets and to hold governments accountable to their commitments under the SDGs.

Data is also essential for governments to fulfill their pledge to leave no one behind in the SDGs; that the goals should be met for all segments of society and that those furthest behind should be reached first. Despite significant progress over the last few years, we are still far away from being able to systematically identify those at risk of being left behind or to monitor their progress towards the 2030 commitments.

Continue reading

Mashreq 2.0: Boosting growth & creating jobs through digital transformation

The force of digitalization is driving the global economy, creating distinct groups of mena-mashreq-2-coverleaders and laggards. Through institutional reform that leverages the advantages of digitalization, the Mashreq can become a vital hub in international data networks. Furthermore, digital transformation can assuage pressing challenges. It can deliver higher transparency, accelerate lackluster productivity and increase economic opportunities for all, especially the youth of this region. A new report, Mashreq 2.0, charts the roadmap for the region to capitalize on this rapidly emerging opportunity, and assesses the prospect of a digitally integrated regional market.

Continue reading

Fighting climate change by planting trees in the sea

I started reading about the Aral Sea disaster in 1989 ahead of my first visit, as a student Aral_Sea_4Y2A1499_0and tourist, to Uzbekistan, then still a Soviet republic. In Karakalpakstan, the autonomous republic in current-day Uzbekistan, the Aral Sea has all but disappeared. Where fishing communities once thrived, all that remains is a scarred, desert landscape. Rusted ships are perched precariously on piles of sand and salt, along with a potent, unhealthy mix of toxic pollutants from industrial agriculture.

Continue reading

Why measuring poverty impacts is more difficult than simply using score cards

Ending poverty is not only one of the twin goals of the World Bank, but also one of the mombasa_image.jpgSustainable Development Goals. To design and optimize projects for poverty reduction, we need to measure their impact on poverty. This is quite difficult because changes in the poverty rate might take some time, and it is usually hard to attribute the impact to a particular project, especially without conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT). But even if we manage to overcome these challenges, we need to measure poverty before the start of the project – as a baseline and to understand whether the project adequately targets the poor – and at the end of the project to assess its impact. And that is also not easy.

Continue reading