Call for Innovation: Impacts of Port Development on West Africa’s Coastal Areas

The World Bank Group is launching a Call for Innovation under the West Africa Coastal WACAAreas Management Program (WACA) to bridge the gap between innovators and port developers/owners to build sustainable and integrated coastal management. The call is part of the WACA Resilience Investment Project (WACA ResIP), a multi-country regional project that aims to support present assets and strengthen the resilience of coastal communities for Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Mauritania, São Tomé and Príncipe, Senegal, and Togo. The project supported them develop multi-sectoral investment planning processes, culminating in WACA Multi Sector Investment Plans (MSIPs).

THE CHALLENGE
The challenge is to identify innovative and feasible solutions to fight coastal erosion and flooding issues associated with the ongoing development of large commercial ports and maritime operations in the six countries. In most cases, existing ports were built with limited if no zero planning and considerations of potential exacerbation of coastal erosion. The significant threat is that this shortcoming is also occurring in the
design and construction of new ports. The scope is to identify innovations that allow to avoid, mitigate, and remediate the geomorphological and ecological impacts associated with existing and planned commercial ports in West Africa.

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Dutch expertise welcome for West Africa coastal management

Coastal erosion and flooding in West Africa severely threaten communities, livelihoods, bb52c334-fea9-47f6-9eae-b5adc66a491dsafety and investment. There is an urgent need for international partners to mobilise financing through coordinated regional action. The World Bank and Netherlands Water Partnership (NWP) are on their way to formalising their partnership to exchange knowledge, expertise and information, and to increase business opportunities for the Dutch water sector. Last week, NWP’s Josephine Damstra attended the first Finance Marketplace in Ivory Coast, which was organised as part of the World Bank’s West Africa Coastal Areas Management Program.

eC2: Nigeria Multi-Sector Investment Plan for Coastal Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Deadline: 17-Jun-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

As part of the World Bank’s West Africa Coastal Areas (WACA) Program, the objective ofSenegal this activity is to develop, in a participatory manner, a Multi-sectoral Investment Plan (MSIP) for coastal risk reduction and climate change adaptation. The MSIP will be an action plan for the development of the Nigerian coastal zone, integrating climate change adaptation and disaster risk management considerations, and focused on but not limited to coastal erosion, flooding, and pollution. The MSIP will take into account all sectors involved in the zone and their contribution, in the medium and long term, for the strategic development of coastal areas in Nigeria. The activity should delineate objective, prioritized investment needs for integrated coastal zone management, providing indicative/estimated financing requirements for priority interventions, and developing a “pre-design” for the highest priority investment in each state (across four states).

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eC2: West Africa Coastal Areas (WACA) Program: Call for innovation to Private Sector Engineering Firms

Deadline: 15-Apr-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

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Launched by the World Bank in partnership with IFC, the WACA Call for Innovation will try to seek solutions for the six WACA countries to reduce the impacts on down drift coastal erosion of port infrastructures, either by retrofitting existing port infrastructures or by building new ones. The solutions can be both passive (a proper design of ports) or active (with e.g. a sand by-pass system). The solutions must ensure their feasibility in the West Africa coastline context.
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eC2: Institutional and Policy Gap Analysis and Recommended Measures for Climate Resilient Coastal Zone Management in West Africa

Deadline: 06-Aug-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The proposed study aims to develop an improved understanding of the climate changewater risks in the coastal areas in the select countries in West Africa (Benin, Côte dIvoire, Mauritania, Senegal and Togo), and determine institutional and policy gaps at national and sub-national levels related to integration of climate change risks, and to articulate suitable recommendations to fill these gaps. The consultancy will be within the scope of the West Africa Coastal Areas Program (WACA, http://www.worldbank.org/waca) and will support the preparation of a multi-countries project financing proposals to the Green Climate Fund.

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Swallowed by the Sea…Where coastal infrastructure and jobs meet climate change

Life is shifting fast for coastal communities in West Africa. In some areas, coastlines are eroding as much as 10 meters per year. Stronger storms and rising seas are wiping out homes, roads and buildings that have served as landmarks for generations.

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I was recently in West Africa to witness the effects of coastal erosion. To understand what’s going on, we took a three-country road trip, traveling from Benin’s capital Cotonou, along the coast to Lomé in Togo and then to Keta and Accra in Ghana. These three countries, among the hardest hit by coastal erosion, offer a snapshot of what is happening along the rest of the coast, from Mauritania, via Senegal to Nigeria. 

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In Benin, Can Resilient Investment Solutions Save a Battered Coast?

I was raised in a small town called Hornsea on England’s east coast, a magnificent blog-in-benin-can-resilient-investment-solutions-save-a-battered-coast-780x439placethat attracts tourists but is eroding faster than the rest of Europe. Some of the impressive, clay cliffs are literally crumbling. Local roads and the old settlement and have fallen into the sea. More than once, forward-planning residents have demolished and rebuilt their houses from salvaged materials as their coast recedes.

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