eC2: National groundwater quality survey and abstraction estimate

Deadline: 24-Sep-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

water_quality_mason_jar

The specific objective of this assignment is to support the elaboration of the next River Basin Management Plans with the implementation of a series of field works over the groundwater bodies not being in good quantitative or chemical status and the groundwater bodies at risk not being in good status. The said field work is aiming at: 1) estimating the number of boreholes tapping each groundwater body and estimating the average pumping yields per usage, both data being necessary for estimating the total pumped yield per groundwater body; and 2) providing a series of groundwater quality analysis be used as a first countrywide groundwater sampling which might be used, in complement with every existing groundwater quantity results, to support the implementation of a state of the art quality monitoring network.

Continue reading

Quality Unknown: The Invisible Water Crisis

The world faces an invisible crisis of water quality. Its impacts are wider, deeper, waterand more uncertain than previously thought and require urgent attention.

While much attention has focused on water quantity – too much water, in the case of floods; too little water, in the case of droughts – water quality has attracted significantly less consideration. Quality Unknown shows that urgent attention must be given to the hidden dangers that lie beneath the water’s surface:

Continue reading

eC2: Formative Research on Baby WASH and Nutrition in Ethiopia

Deadline: 21-Aug-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) wash-hands-98641_640

A key cause of child stunting in low-income settings could be related to asymptomatic gut infections known as environmental enteropathies (EE), caused in part by unhygienic conditions in early childhood. Thus, improvements in sanitation and hygiene conditions from the time of birth may help to prevent or reduce the prevalence of EE, and therefore stunting. Conventional water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions, i.e. improved household toilets, improved drinking water, and handwashing with soap may not fully address these early fecal-oral exposures. For example, animal feces are likely a dominant source of fecal contamination in low-income settings even in areas of high sanitation coverage and low rates of open defecation. Similarly, food hygiene is an often-overlooked contributor to enteric infections in early childhood. Complementary hygiene interventions are needed to address neglected pathways of exposure.

Continue reading

Understanding the “new rurality” in Latin America and what it means to the water and sanitation sector

Despite the urbanization trends seen in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC), it seems 23845439171_fb7b1102e1_othat the rural population in LAC is decreasing in relative terms. In 2001, official figures indicated that 125 million people in LAC resided in rural areas representing 24% of the total LAC population. In 2013, this value decreased to 21% (130 million out of a total population of 609 million inhabitants), and it is estimated that by 2030, the rural population will decrease to represent 16.5% of the total (CEPAL, 2014).

Continue reading

eC2: Chemical status assessment methodology reflecting the impacts of the climate changes on the status of surface water

Deadline: 11-Jul-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

water_quality_mason_jar

The assignment consists of the following activities:
Activity 1. Pressure and impact analysis taking into account new priority pollutants included in Directive 2013/39/EC and new industrial activities.
Activity 2 Chemical Status assessment.
Activity 3: Training of experts on the application of developed methodology for chemical status assessment.
Activity 4. Assessment of chemical status of water bodies in the country based on defined background concentrations, refined methodologies for chemical status assessment (including application of BLM) and available results (EEA).
Activity 5. Proposal for new monitoring programs or at least proposal for new monitoring points and pollutants for measurement. Critical evaluation of concentration of pollutants that has never been introduced in the country and never measured above EQS and proposal for their elimination from monitoring programs.

Continue reading

Is the urban water and sanitation sector frozen in time?

Blog by Caroline van den Berg, World Bank Group

If time travel were possible, and an engineer from the 1860s could travel in time to 2019, sewage_pipes_under_london_19th_century_wellcome_l0000616he (the first female engineer had not graduated yet) would not recognize much of the technology we have today.  Personal computers, cell phones, cars, planes, and antibiotics would probably be unfathomable to him.   But he would definitely recognize our current piped water and sanitation (WSS) infrastructure, as it looks and operates almost exactly the same as it did 150 years ago.  Certainly, there have been significant improvements in the sector, especially in water and wastewater treatment, but the principles on which the piped WSS technology is based have not seen any fundamental changes since the 1860s, when it was (re)introduced on a large scale.

Continue reading

Integrated urban flood risk management: Learning from the Japanese experience

In the summer of 1742, two typhoons swept across Japan in quick succession, bringing water_quality_mason_jartorrents of heavy rain and flooding major rivers. Records from a young monk who witnessed the floods describe a muddy wave destroying levees and sweeping through villages. As levees and rivers collapsed, floodwaters rose in Edo, Japan’s largest c

ity and political capital, abating o

nly days later, and

resulting in fatalities of a reported 6,000 in the city.
Continue reading

eC2: Wastewater Management Facilities for Gazipur City Corporation, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Deadline: 13-May-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Gazipur City Corporation (GCC), Greater Dhaka, with an objective to improve public untitledinfrastructure for wastewater management in the selected areas under its jurisdiction (Zones 1 and 4) plans to develop, operate and maintain following facilities:
– a Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) and a Fecal Sludge Treatment Plant (FSTP);
– a Sewerage Network System (SNS);
– a Centralized Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) for industries; and
– a non-network fecal and sludge removal system in the non-sewerage areas.

Continue reading

eC2: Mauritania Water Sector: Institutional Diagnostic of the Central Directions and Structures (ONSER, CNRE) under the supervision of the MHA

Deadline: 09-May-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) water

The main objective of this study is to make a legal, institutional, organizational and technical (in terms of capacity) diagnosis of how the following institutions work and interact with one another to deliver drinking water and sanitation services to rural and semi-urban populations in Mauritania:
1. Directorate of Hydraulics
2. Directorate of Sanitation
3. Directorate of Hydrology and Dams
4. Policy, Monitoring and Cooperation Directorate
5. Regional Directorates of Hydraulics and Sanitation.
And the institutions under the supervision of the MHA which are:
6. ONSER
7. The CNRE
Based on this diagnosis, proposals for improving the organization, functioning and efficiency of these structures of the public water service will be formulated in the form of a functional reorganization plan of the MHA and the entities under its supervision. The ways and means needed to improve the interaction and cooperation between these various structures will also be laid down.

Continue reading

eC2:Determination of the capacity of water bodies to take nutrient pollution

Deadline: 02-May-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)waterkraan-nieuws-header

The assignment comprises of three main activities:
Activity 1: Identification and quantification of the factors determining the self-purification ability of different types of water bodies of categories river, lake and transitional waters
Activity 2: Identification of the impact of different concentrations of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus forms) on the ecological status of the different types of water bodies of categories river, lake and transitional waters
Activity 3: Development, testing and validation of methodology/mathematical models for determining the capacity of different types of water bodies of categories river, lake and transitional waters

Continue reading