10 Years of Green Bonds: Creating the Blueprint for Sustainability Across Capital Markets

The phone call to the World Bank Treasury came out of the blue: in late 2007, a group of imagesSwedish pension funds wanted to invest in projects that help the climate, but they did not know how to find these projects. But they knew where to turn and called on the World Bank to help. Less than a year later, the World Bank issued the first green bond—and with it, created a new way to connect financing from investors to climate projects.

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Trees and forests are key to fighting climate change and poverty. So are women

According to IUCN’s ‘Global Forest Watch’, from 2001 to 2017, 337 million hectares of liberia_market_womantropical tree cover was lost globally – an area the size of India.

So, we appear to be losing the battle, if not the war, against tropical deforestation, and missing a key opportunity to tackle climate change (if tropical deforestation were a country, it would rank 3rd in emissions) and reduce poverty. A key question, then, is what can forest sector investors, governments and other actors do differently to reverse these alarming trends?

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Introducing the new representative at the Inter-American Development Bank: Bjorn Kuil

On August 1st Bjorn Kuil started as Senior Counselor at the Board of the Inter-American bjorn kuilDevelopment Bank, having previously held the position of senior policy officer at the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs since October 2013.  “Throughout my career in the public and private sector I’ve come to realize that finance can leverage relationships, mitigate risks, and plays an important catalytic role. It has become my mission working towards sustainable, inclusive economic development as this is an indispensable part of efforts to combat poverty and improve global living conditions in line with the Sustainable Development Agenda. When looking at all the challenges facing the world, including inequality, population migration, and climate change, there is a clear role for development finance in nearly all of them.”

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Our children’s planet: What does their education have to do with climate change?

Our world is very different than our grandparent’s. In 1950, there were about 2.5 billion 1_dshzzz8-5ywxq6sjduincwpeople; today, there are more than 7 billion. Overall, people are healthier, wealthier, and more secure.

But this has come at a cost. The stress on our planet has been immense. Human beings have dramatically altered the climate, changed the chemistry of the oceans, and triggered mass extinctions. The impact has been so great as to define an entirely new geological era — the Anthropocene, turbo charged by a “great acceleration” of population, economic growth and natural resource consumption since the 1950s.

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Bracing for climate change – a matter of survival for the Maldives

For low-lying island states, the impacts of global warming and climate change can be a maldives-blog-hart1matter of survival. The irony is that while these states have not contributed much to greenhouse emissions, as they produce very little, they may face some of the worst consequences.  The Maldives is no stranger to the risks from climate change. It is already witnessing an increase in intense rainfall and resultant flooding, cyclonic winds and storm surges. As one of the lowest-lying countries in the world, with all its people living a few meters above sea level and over two thirds of its critical infrastructure lying within 100 meters of the shoreline, a sea level rise of just a few meters will put the nation further at risk, endangering its relative prosperity.

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eC2: Capacity building in support of weather, water and climate services in Mali and Niger

Deadline: 04-Feb-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The World Bank is one of the implementing partners of the Climate Risk and Early pexels-photo-831890.jpegWarning Systems (CREWS) initiative and through the CREWS initiative provides complementary technical assistance to the national hydrological and meteorological services of Mali and Niger in capacity building and institutional strengthening for national weather, water and climate services, early warning system. The World Bank is looking for a qualified consulting firm (incl. universities or similar institutions) to deliver technical assistance with this regard.

The overall objective of this assignment is to strengthen the capacity of the national hydro-meteorological services of Mali and Niger. More specifically, the consultancy has four main objectives: (a) Provide guidance for strengthening technical and human capacity of all relevant stakeholders in Mali and Niger; (b) Provide tailored short courses to strengthen the technical capacity of the technical experts of the national hydrometeorological services in Mali and Niger; (c) Provide guidance on the communication and awareness raising for effective weather, water and climate services in Mali and Niger; and (d) provide guidance on investment planning and public-private services for effective weather, water and climate services in Mali and Niger.

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Tackling climate change in the poorest countries

How can we help the poorest countries deal with climate change? The challenge is huge. Globally, the last three years were the hottest on record.  Emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels and industry started rising again in 2017 after briefly leveling off. Many regions are experiencing more severe and frequent storms, floods, and drought. According to the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, the climate consequences of a 2°C warmer world are far greater than for a rise of 1.5°C, and we are not on track for either. 20120903-burundi-farhat-9869

Recognizing the urgent need for more action, the World Bank Group announced new and ambitious targets for our climate work with developing countries at COP24, this month’s global climate change conference in Katowice, Poland.

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Riding the Climate Storm in Patagones, Argentina

When 31-year old Hipolito de Carmony, a third-generation farmer, wants to explain why Picture-1he introduced change in the management of his family’s land, he pulls out a picture of a giant dust storm that swept through the area of Patagones, about 1,000 km south of the city of Buenos Aires, in January 2010.

“We couldn’t see from one house to the other. Even with the doors and windows shut, we had to constantly sweep layers of fine dust,” he said.

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Time to ask the tough questions about transport and climate

Last month, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change drew global attention by th-bangkok-traffic-bernard-spragg-flickr_0providing fresh and overwhelming evidence about the urgency of the climate situation. According to the agency’s latest report, global temperatures will reach 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels within the next 12 years—unless we act now.

Transport bears a huge responsibility in the current situation: the sector contributes to nearly a quarter of global energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and 18% of all manmade emissions in the global economy.  Under a business-as-usual scenario, this figure will continue rising to reach 1/3 of all emissions by 2040.
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A warming world means it’s high time to rethink the composition of agricultural support

From the Old Farmer’s Almanac to cutting edge satellite systems, farmers have always 1_5crbT9T-oYZglwyLYlnexgbeen in the market for weather forecasts that help them decide when to plant and harvest to mitigate climate risks. Earlier this month, the 48th session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change delivered sobering news: the Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (SR1.5) concluded that climate impacts are already occurring and will be much worse at 2°C than previously projected.

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