eC2:  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines -Improving Urban Resilience of Coastal Cities in the Caribbean through Resilient Infrastructure and Urban Planning

Deadline:   21-Oct-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) blog-in-benin-can-resilient-investment-solutions-save-a-battered-coast-780x439

The objective is to provide professional expertise to develop a comprehensive urban resilience plan for the select coastal cities in Saint Vincent & the Grenadines, which aims to,
1.Study approaches for improving urban infrastructure planning to achieve resilience goals in coastal cities for the sustainable concurrence of the urban space with natural environment;
2.Help urban practitioners better understand the integration of green with existing grey infrastructure and contextually inform cities planning strategies; and
3.Forge an urban vision to identify infrastructure need and investment opportunities for the cities in the selected coastal areas.
Scope of Work: As part of the EU-GFDRR/WB Regional Resilience Program for LAC, the project will focus on carrying out diagnostic work related to urban resilience in selected coastal cities in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The main obj. is to develop an integrated vision for building resilience and sustainability into infrastructure.

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How Can We Increase Women’s Participation in Infrastructure Projects?

On construction sites, it is more common to see men working than women. With the aim Clara1of improving the gender balance in construction, the World Bank is implementing gender strategies in urban transport projects in Colombia. These have  led to the increased participation of women in infrastructure projects.

Gender discrimination not only has a negative impact on women’s income; it also impedes companies and society from making use of the special skills that women contribute to the economy. The implementation of a gender equality strategy in the Bucaramanga Integrated Mass Transport System– Metrolínea – revealed the advantages of including women in this type of project and provided lessons that could be shared with other systems, sectors and projects.

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In the pandemic, cities are scrambling to expand cycling infrastructure: Big Data can help

The coronavirus (COVID-19) and lockdown measures have created immense challenges co-cyclists-secretaria movilidad-bogotafor urban transport. But they also provide an opportunity for cities to rethink the future of mobility. Cycling, in particular, is enjoying renewed attention. This is not surprising, as biking offers many advantages that make it an attractive form of urban transport both during and after the pandemic: bicycles can ease the pressure on public transit systems, allow for easy social distancing, contribute to better public health, and reduce air pollution.

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eC2: Natural Hazard Assessment for the Reconstruction of Critical Transport Infrastructure

Deadline: 23-Mar-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The World Bank provides technical assistance to the Government of Myanmar to support maldives-blog-hart1technical solutions for Chin State by hiring an international consulting firm to prepare a hazard and vulnerability assessment for road rehabilitation to inform planned investments under the Myanmar Floods and Landslides Emergency Recovery Project in Chin State in Myanmar. The overall objective of the assignment is to contribute to the increase of capacities of the relevant ministries and agencies of the Government of Myanmar in the adoption of appropriate natural hazard assessment approaches in designing transport and infrastructure. The activity will (i) help provide technical solutions on geohazards specifically for Kalay Hakha road, based on an assessment of hazards; (ii) draw out lessons along the above process, including data gaps and recommend technical and monitoring solutions for improvement; (iii) and provide capacity building for the Ministry of Construction on this practice. The assignment is expected to be completed within the period of an estimated six months upon mobilization.

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eC2: Community Mapping Urban Risks in Mwanza Tanzania

Deadline: 19-Mar-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The objective of this assignment is to inform the socio-economic exposure analysis of thewater TURP flood risk assessment for Mwanza city. This will be done by providing design and management of mapping campaigns in Mwanza from May October 2020 with a focus on three core mapping campaigns: i) Digitization services for 2020 building exposure updates; ii) Drainage infrastructure and river mapping; iii) Participatory Mapping of Unplanned Communities; iv) Household flood and rockfall historical incidents mapping.

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World Bank data infrastructure: shortening the path from data to insights

Data is not valuable in a vacuum. Data is only valuable once information, insight or in data_infrastructure_visualother words knowledge is extracted from it and is used to make decisions, shape policies, and change behaviors.

Data scientists, analysts, and researchers spend a significant amount of time and effort extracting knowledge from data and communicating it. Because extracting knowledge from data can be expensive, it is important to find ways to reduce its cost. A robust and well-designed data infrastructure can contribute to this cost reduction by smoothing the frictions involved with data analytics projects: storing, searching, accessing, understanding, cleaning, transforming, analyzing, and visualizing data. Lowering that cost can go a long way toward increasing data use and knowledge production.

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eC2: West Africa: Regional Digital Infrastructure Market Development

Deadline: 03-Feb-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) 7_disruptive_tech

The objective of this assignment is two-fold: (i) to conduct a deep-dive gap analysis of the existing legal, competition and regulatory framework, and subsequent market outcomes, in 4-6 selected countries to identify specific areas that require strengthening to promote broadband infrastructure and service market development at both the country and regional levels; and (ii) based on the gap analysis, prepare Reform Roadmaps for each country, consisting of carefully sequenced reforms and investment prioritizations for the next 5 years (up to 2025). The Reform Roadmaps will identify policy and regulatory actions necessary to remove bottlenecks for digital infrastructure growth at both the wholesale and retail levels, as well as at country and regional (i.e. cross-border) levels, to ultimately prepare the foundations of a West Africa regional digital economy.

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eC2: Sector Impact Assessment of Subnational Infrastructure Investments in Indonesia

Deadline: 13-Nov-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)index

Consultant firm to provide support to the World Bank team in conducting the detailed regional impact analysis for several projects financed through RIDF and/or municipal bonds. The consultant firm will also prepare a guidance note on the analysis and conduct series of trainings to the relevant stakeholders.

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eC2: Strengthening Resilience in Road Transport Infrastructure in Indonesia

Deadline: 18-Nov-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

A man stands next to a bridge on the East Cape Road. The East Ca

The main objective of this activity, financed by the mentioned grant, is guiding the Directorate General of Highways (DGH) towards achieving long-term climate-resilient road and bridge infrastructure in Indonesia. The key actions that will help to achieve this goal are to: (i) review selected road and bridge existing manuals and guidelines on, among others, disaster risk management and slope protection, stabilization, and erosion; (ii) advice and provide technical inputs to enhance such documents; (iii) develop a set of communication materials to raise awareness of good practice; and (iv) provide technical assistance to DGH to increase their capacity.

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Making infrastructure work for both women and men

Despite decades of progress, the global infrastructure gap is still significant: around untitled940m people live without electricity, 2.2bn lack safely managed water, 4.2bn lack safely managed sanitation facilities and 1bn live more than 2 km away from an all-season road.

This gap has a different meaning for women: infrastructure is not gender-neutral. The gaps in access to good infrastructure—and how it is designed, built and run—affects men and women differently.  For instance, it is well documented that women are responsible for obtaining water for domestic use in most countries, which has a big impact on how they spend their time. In Niger, the average time women and girls spend fetching water adds up to 13 days a year. Lack of access to electricity results in household drudgery for women, due to lack of lighting, electric water pumps and refrigeration. 

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