High-Performance Health-Financing for Universal Health Coverage: Driving Sustainable, Inclusive Growth in the 21st Century

Just over a decade out from the SDG deadline of 2030, many developing countries are notUHC_v6 on track to meet Universal Health Coverage (UHC) targets to ensure access to quality, affordable health services to all. People in developing countries pay over half a trillion dollars annually out-of-pocket for health services, which is pushing about 100 million people into extreme poverty each year. The evidence is strong that progress towards UHC would spur not just better health but also inclusive and sustainable economic growth, yet this report estimates that in 2030 there will be a UHC financing gap of $176 billion in the 54 poorest countries.  This  threatens decades-long progress on health, endangers countries’ long-term economic prospects, and makes them more vulnerable to pandemic risks. This report, launched to inform the first-ever G20 Finance and Health Ministers session in Osaka, Japan in June 2019, lays out an action agenda for countries and development partners to bridge the UHC financing gap, and makes a strong case for a focus on innovation in health financing over the next decade.

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Chart: 47 million people are connected to a mini grid

A mini grid is an electric power generation and distribution system that provides electricity to a localized community. Mini grids will be critical in achieving universal electricity access by 2030. According to a new World Bank report “Mini Grids for Half a Billion People: Market Outlook and Handbook for Decision Makers”, mini grids are often the most economically viable solution for remote areas with high population density and demand and where extending the main grid is prohibitively expensive.

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Today, 47 million people are connected to a mini grid.  Afghanistan, Myanmar, India and Nepal have the highest number of mini grids, followed by China, Philippines, Indonesia. Analysis by the Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP) shows that by 2030, nearly half a billion people could be connected to a mini grid. 

Mini Grids for Half a Billion People: Market Outlook and Handbook for Decision Makers

STORY HIGHLIGHTS MIniGrids_WebBanner.jpg

  • Mini grids have the potential to provide electricity to as many as 500 million people by 2030, with the right policies and about $220 billion of investment to build around 210,000 mini grids.
  • Over the past decade, mini grid costs have declined significantly, while the quality of service has increased. The per kWh cost of mini grid electricity is expected to decrease by two thirds by 2030.
  • Significantly more mini grids will need to be deployed in the top 20 electricity access deficit countries – from 10-50 mini grids currently deployed each year per country to over 1,600.

Lifelines for Better Development

Published on http://www.worldbank.org, June 19, 2019

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Resilient infrastructure is about people. Particularly in developing countries, Lifelines22--1-infrastructure disruptions are an everyday concern that affects people’s well-being, economic prospects, and quality of life.
  • There is a significant economic opportunity from investing in resilient infrastructure: the overall net benefit of doing so in developing countries would be $4.2 trillion over the lifetime of new infrastructure.
  • For infrastructure investors, governments, development banks and the private sector the message is clear: rather than just spending more, also spend better

Infrastructure is at the heart of lives and livelihoods. It can enable schools and hospitals, businesses and industry, and access to jobs and prosperity. In developing countries, however, disruptions to infrastructure are an everyday concern, reducing opportunities for employment, hampering health and education, and limiting economic growth.

In low and middle-income countries, direct damages from natural hazards to power generation and transport alone cost $18 billion a year, cutting into the already scarce budget of road agencies and power utilities. But the main impact of natural shocks on infrastructure is through the disruptions they impose on people and communities, for instance, businesses unable to keep factories running or use the internet to take orders and process payments; or on the households that don’t have the water they need to prepare meals or on people unable to go to work, send children to school, or get to a hospital.

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Which Way to Livable and Productive Cities? : A Road Map for Sub-Saharan Africa

For African cities to grow economically as they have grown in size, they must create 9781464814051_pdfproductive environments to attract investments, increase economic efficiency, and create livable environments that prevent urban costs from rising with increased population densification. What are the central obstacles that prevent African cities and towns from becoming sustainable engines of economic growth and prosperity? Among the most critical factors that limit the growth and livability of urban areas are land markets, investments in public infrastructure and assets, and the institutions to enable both. To unleash the potential of African cities and towns for delivering services and employment in a livable and environmentally friendly environment, a sequenced approach is needed to reform institutions and policies and to target infrastructure investments. This book lays out three foundations that need fixing to guide cities and towns throughout Sub-Saharan Africa on their way to productivity and livability.

Download full report here.

 

eC2: State and Trends of Carbon Pricing Report 2019

Deadline: 28-Nov-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

(i)S&T19: The 2019 report will focus on providing an updated overview of existing and indexemerging carbon pricing initiatives around the world including national, sub-national and corporate activities, emissions trading systems, carbon taxes, and crediting mechanisms Building on the efforts made in 2018, it will include a discussion on the carbon pricing trends. It will also address the feedback received last year and focus on developing clearer lessons learned from the various carbon pricing initiatives and from various publications (including WBG ones), improved infographics featuring key facts and numbers. In addition, it will feature a section on the various ways to price carbon, including through implicit and negative carbon pricing policies. Finally, the report will continue to complete the online dashboard that was launched in 2017, and which allows for direct access to this data and more regular updates. This report is expected to have approximately about 50 pages.

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eC2: Data Collection, Model Development and Scenario Analysis for Complex Water Systems

Deadline: 13-Oct-2016 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The World Bank’s Complex Water Systems (COWS) Initiative has the objective of HYDROfacilitating the Bank managements and task teams access to analytical expertise for supporting engagements on challenging and high-priority complex water systems. COWS supports the World Bank Group-wide priority engagements that require technical expertise, for understanding and providing solutions to the challenges involving multiple sectors, parties, and time scales.

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She Works – IFC Report

sheworks_socialpostcards_v2_2This report marks the end of the IFC-led SheWorks global private sector partnership to advance employment opportunities and improve working conditions for more than 300,000 women by 2016. It consolidates the knowledge, best practices, and lessons learned during the two-year SheWorks partnership so that other companies committed to investing in women’s employment can benefit as well. The report also captures, on an aggregate level, the progress made by SheWorks member companies towards realizing their commitments.

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IFC report: From Companies to Markets

Global Developments in Corporate Governance

The report draws on the expertise of the IFC Corporate Governance Group, members of the IFC Corporate Governance Private Sector Advisory Group and many other practitioners in this important field, providing a fascinating and detailed accounting of the range of changes that have taken place in the past few years as the corporate governance agenda has been elevated.

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The content is based on discussions that took place in May 2015 during the practice group meeting on codes and standards.

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How can ICT initiatives be designed to improve rural water supply?

Policy briefing
water
Around the world today, more and more people have access to water supplies. But making sure that these supplies are sustainable is still a problem. To try and solve this, some new initiatives are using information and communication technologies (ICTs) to try and improve the way that water supplies are monitored and maintained.

 

Read full report here