Strategic Health Purchasing for Universal Health Coverage in Indonesia Phase 2 Strategic Health Purchasing for Priority Programs

Deadline: 24-Jan-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)medical-appointment-doctor-healthcare-clinic-health-hospital-medicine[7]

Support for Strategic Purchasing in Priority Programs (Phase 2, 2018-2019)is a continuation of the Phase 1 ‘Strategic Health Purchasing Technical Support’ (2016-2018)which was focusing on functional and regulatory review of strategic purchasing under JKN. Phase 2 will implement the strategic health purchasing based on findings from Phase 1, including identify options for improving purchasing and provider payment arrangements through a facilitated participatory technical working group (TWG) process for TB and Maternal Health, institutionalize capacity for budget impact analysis in BPJS and or P2JK -MOH to routinely assess the potential impact of alternative provider payment options on JKN expenditures and sustainability; and design options for a routine monitoring system for BPJS, MOH especially P2JK-MOH and other stakeholders to effectively monitor budget and service delivery impacts of provider payment arrangements for the national priority programs,namely TB and MNH service delivery
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Lack of Health Care is a Waste of Human Capital: 5 Ways to Achieve Universal Health Coverage By 2030

When Cecilia Rodriguez was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune UHC2disease that causes inflammation and pain in the joints, eight years ago, she had a major revelation. She realized that what she was promoting as director of a primary health care facility in Chile was very different than what she actually needed as a patient.

In response, she founded the nonprofit Fundación Me Muevo with her sister, who also has rheumatoid arthritis, to support people affected by the chronic condition. She also became a patient advocate — Me Muevo is part of a growing movement of patient-led organizations in Chile. “Health care systems tend to be geared towards treating acute illnesses and are rarely organized to help patients with lifelong diseases,” Cecilia says. “We called the NGO Me Muevo (‘I move’) because we learned that with this condition you have to keep your body moving, but also because ‘I move’ means ‘I take action.’”

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What lessons for social protection from universal health coverage?

It’s not so long since the days when speaking of ‘universal health coverage’ used to medical-appointment-doctor-healthcare-clinic-health-hospital-medicine[7]provoke shockwaves. Happily, the principle that “… everyone having access to the health care they need without suffering financial hardship” is now widely recognized and documented. And although few countries have achieved this goal in practice, it is clearly within reach, including in low-income countries like Rwanda.

Social protection seems to be on a similar trajectory, with universality now enshrined in commitments and declarations. Yet the provision of universal social protection (USP) is hotly contested — take the debates around Universal Basic Income and Employment Guarantee Programs.

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Keeping the promise of inclusive Universal Health Coverage: new data can improve health services for LGBTI people

600-holding-hands-talashow-shutterstock_002.jpgWhen the door closed behind her, Maria’s world seemed to collapse. The mother of a girl and two boys had just learned that her eldest son, the teenager who became the pillar of the family after their father died, was not only in a deep depression and increasingly using alcohol but he was gay. She had noticed him becoming moodier and even heard he received a warning at his job for not showing up, something totally unlike him at all. She felt helpless but knew his depression had to stay hidden from the rest of the family and the neighbors as mental health problems brought with them social stigma. But she was most afraid someone would find out he was gay, causing the family to be ostracized and endangering the future of the other children.

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Partners Launch Framework to Accelerate Universal Health Coverage in Africa; World Bank and Global Fund Commit $24 Billion

Press Release; 26 August, 2016

African Heads of State and Partners Mobilize around Plans for Universal Health Coverage to medical-appointment-doctor-healthcare-clinic-health-hospital-medicine[7]Achieve 2030 Sustainable Development Goals

NAIROBI, Kenya, August 26, 2016—Today at the Sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD-VI), African heads of state and partners vowed to accelerate progress toward universal health coverage (UHC) in Africa. To help countries implement their health reforms, the World Bank and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (Global Fund) committed to invest $24 billion in Africa over the next three to five years.

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FRIDAY:World Bank Live Stream Africa

Interested in learning more about Health Coverage and the Role of the Private Sector in Africa? Follow the live stream FRIDAY which includes speaker World Bank President Jim Kim, Japan President Shinzo Abe, President of Kenya Uhuru Kenyatta.

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Universal health coverage programs transforming care for poorest and most vulnerable

Article originally published on World Bank website.

The expansion of universal health coveragenurses-in-tonga is critical: According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank Group, 400 million people do not have access to essential health services and 6% of people in low- and middle-income countries are tipped into or pushed further into extreme poverty because of out-of-pocket health spending. The World Bank report, Going Universal: How 24 countries are implementing universal health coverage reforms from the bottom up, looks at how 24 countries have embarked on the path to universal health coverage and are expanding coverage to the poor—who too often get much less from their health systems than the better-off. Continue reading

“Universal health coverage in a generation is achievable”

This article was published on September 15 on the World Bank website.

As the father of four children, I know nurse-cleans-newborn-sierra-leone-hospitalhow important access to good, quality health care is. All parents aspire to be able to provide the same for their children. That’s why we at the World Bank Group are working with our partners around the globe to make universal health coverage a reality for all.

Today, universal health coverage means that citizens get the health care they need without suffering severe financial hardship Continue reading

Towards Universal Health Coverage – Blog by Onno Ruhl & Somil Nagpal

Blog by Onno Ruhl, Dutch national and World Bank Country Director in India, and Somil Nagpal, Senior Health Specialist. This blog was published on December 16, 2014 on the World Bank website.

Scaling up public health investments alone will not suffice. It will be equally critical to improve accountability.

On Friday, 12 December, for the first time the world celebrated universal health coverage day. On this day two years ago, the United Nations unanimously endorsed a resolution urging governments to ensure that all people can access healthcare without financial hardship.

Until now, most people in India have dug deep into their pockets to pay doctors, pharmacies and diagnostic centres. Paying in this manner—or out-of-pocket spending, as it is called—has been the norm for a long time in India but this is not how most of the world pays for healthcare. In most other countries, including some less developed ones, out-of-pocket spending is far less common than we think. It is far more likely that people pay their medical expenses in some organized manner, such as through tax-financed healthcare or some form of health insurance.

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