Unleashing the economic power of women

By David Malpass, President World Bank Group
March 3, 2020

Girls are attending school in greater numbers than ever before, and women are girls-education-women-empowermentincreasingly entering the labor force and leading businesses. Although we should celebrate this progress, much work remains in order for a girl born today to have the same opportunities as a boy.

Research from the World Bank and others shows that unleashing the economic power of women can contribute to global growth.  Moreover, it is the right thing to do. Fortunately, more countries recognize that economies can reach their full potential only with the full participation of both women and men.

The World Bank Group is supporting countries in achieving this goal in important areas, including the removal of discriminatory laws, investment to close gender gaps, broadening access to finance, and stepping up efforts to prevent gender-based violence.

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Legislating gender equality in the workplace through pay transparency

Author: Kathleen Beegle ;Lead Economist with the World Bank Gender Groupfinancial-inclusion-gender

A number of recent posts on Development Impact have focused on gaps in labor market outcomes for men and women. This includes some posts in the job market series in late 2019 and, in 2020, a look at the ‘dismal statistic’ on female-to-male labor force participation rates in India and Pakistan, changing the way women think about themselves and what they can do as a means to closing gaps, and a summary of the World Bank’s Research Group recruitment. The latter was underpinned by goal setting in the shortlisting process with respect to between men and women applicants. Fun fact: such quota setting with respect to the composition of candidates to interview is known in the U.S. as the Rooney Rule — established by the U.S. National Football League in 2003 and named after the former owner of the Pittsburgh Steelers (and intended not in regards to women hires but with regards to ethnic-minority candidates in coaching and senior league jobs, though it is now used more generally in the private sector).

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Handbook for Gender-Inclusive Urban Planning and Design

STORY HIGHLIGHTS handbook

  • Urban planning and design shape the environment around us – and that environment, in turn, shapes how we live, work, play, move, and rest.
  • Cities have historically been planned and designed for men and by men. They tend to reflect traditional gender roles and gendered division of labor. In general, cities work better for heterosexual, able-bodied, cisgender men than they do for women, girls, sexual and gender minorities, and people with disabilities.
  • The Handbook for Gender-Inclusive Urban Planning and Design seeks to respond to these urgent questions: how might we design and plan cities that work well for everyone? What would such a city look like, and how would we go about creating it?

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eC2: Gender capacity building for National Trade Facilitation Committees in West Africa

Deadline: 24-Feb-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The consulting firm will be recruited to conduct the needs assessment of National Tradewomen-finance-blogpost Facilitation Committees (NTFCs) in 15 West African countries, design training materials, and roll out the training. The assignment is in two phases. The winner of the phase 1 contract will be awarded the phase 2 upon successful completion of the phase 1.

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eC2: Gender-disaggregated Impacts of Street Lighting in Brazil

Deadline: 30-Jan-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) Solar-street-lights-in-Guinea1

The objective of this activity is to carry out a qualitative baseline assessment of the effects of street lighting (or the lack of it) on mens and womens perceptions of safety and on mobility, economic activity, and educational and professional opportunities. The analysis will also include a comprehensive qualitative assessment of the current level of street lighting (pole presence, energy source, technology, brightness, availability, reliability, etc.), and a review of the literature on the impacts of street lighting on crime and violence.

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eC2: Closing Gaps in Womens Employment in the Africa Energy Sector Terms of Reference | AFR Womens Employment Consultancy

Deadline: 13-Jan-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) rw_gender_ag_blog

There will be key criteria for the development of the deliverables:
1. Gender Gaps: A focus on gender equality priorities across the categories policy, leadership, employment, is expected.
2. Client Focus: The focus will be on providing relevant content and recommendations( strategies/remedial actions, activities and programmes) to the WB and KenGen which will be focused in the energy sector and other sectors such as education etc.
3. Partnerships: The consultant will be expected to map out feasible partnerships with e.g. like minded companies and institutions professional associations, universities and NGOs as part of the outputs delivered.
4. Budget and Sustainability: Key will be mapping costs and timelines of the interventions proposed in the gender options analysis. This is essential for sustainability.
5. Key Performance Indicators. What will be the success factors
6. Monitoring and Evaluation Framework. Define how to measure success

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eC2: Market Assessment: Concept Development for PNG Technical Training Center for Women

Deadline: 17-Jun-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

To address both the skills gap and the gender gap, IFC, in partnership with construction

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company Rhodes PNG, is exploring the possibility of establishing a technical training college for women in PNG. Rhodes PNG has identified a site located at their Napa Napa campus, outside of Port Moresby, and have indicated they are interested in donating that site for use as a womens technical training college. IFC is now at the stage of conducting a detailed market assessment which will feed into the development of a detailed business plan for the proposed training college (Womens TVET project).

The objective of this assignment is to conduct a landscape analysis and market study to assess the feasibility of the proposed Womens TVET Project. It will include an assessment of the industry demand for skills and commitment toward supporting improved supply of skilled workers; , the current training supply in PNG; as well as the challenges and opportunities for women to access more and better training, and ultimately to access jobs. This assignment also aims to raise awareness of the project and obtain initial buy-in from industry.

Outputs under this assignment will be use to canvass potential investors and inform a go/ no go decision prior to developing a full business plan

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eC2: Development of Gender Strategies and Action Plans for ECOWAS, ECCAS and SADC under the Building Resilience to Natural Hazards in Sub-Saharan African Regions, Countries and Communities Program

Deadline: 24-Dec-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) vn-communitybased-disasterrisk-780x439

The Bank is seeking the services of a firm to carry out activities for the inclusive preparation of Gender Strategy and Action Plans (GSAPs) for the following Regional Economic Communities (RECs): The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS); The Economic Community for Central African States (ECCAS); and The Southern African Development Community (SADC). They have expressed the need for support for developing comprehensive and effective guidelines for mainstreaming gender considerations into disaster risk management policies, plans of action and programs. Tasks include preparation of individual Inception Reports for each REC; gender analysis and stakeholder consultations; REC-level discussions and feedback events; and finalization of customized Gender Strategies and Action Plans in Disaster Risk Management for each REC.

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Tackling gender inequality through investments in health equity

Still today, in almost all societies around the world, women are less well-off than men.democratic-republic-congo_final_edit_0029.jpg Women are still paid less than men; they are less represented in business, politics and decision-making. Their life chances remain overwhelmingly less promising than those of men.

This inequality hurts us all. The world would be 20% better off if women were paid the same as men. Delaying early marriage in the developing world by just a few years would add more than $500 billion to annual global economic output by 2030.

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Investing in People to Build Human Capital

Scientific and technological advances are transforming lives: they are even helping investing-in-people2poorer countries close the gap with rich countries in life expectancy. But, poorer countries still face tremendous challenges, as almost a quarter of children under five are malnourished, and 60 percent of primary school students are failing to achieve even a rudimentary education. In fact, more than 260 million children and youth in poorer countries are receiving no education at all.

There is a moral case to be made, of course, for investing in the health and education of all people.  But there is an economic one as well: to be ready to compete and thrive in a rapidly changing environment. “Human capital” – the potential of individuals – is going to be the most important long-term investment any country can make for its people’s future prosperity and quality of life.

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