Global Economy to Edge Up to 3.1 percent in 2018 but Future Potential Growth a Concern

GEP2018a_Table1-1Current Slack in Global Economy Expected to Fade

WASHINGTON, January 9, 2018— The World Bank forecasts global economic growth to edge up to 3.1 percent in 2018 after a much stronger-than-expected 2017, as the recovery in investment, manufacturing, and trade continues, and as commodity-exporting developing economies benefit from firming commodity prices.

However, this is largely seen as a short-term upswing. Over the longer term, slowing potential growth—a measure of how fast an economy can expand when labor and capital are fully employed—puts at risk gains in improving living standards and reducing poverty around the world, the World Bank warns in its January 2018 Global Economic Prospects.

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World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings 2016 Development Committee Communiqué

Press Release; October 8th, 2016

1. The Development Committee met today, October 8, in Washington, D.C.

2. Global economic growth remains sluggish in 2016, with only a modest pick-up expected in 2017. Demand has remained soft despite highly stimulative monetary policies, foreign direct investment to developing countries has decreased, commodity exporters are adjusting to declines in exports, and wider geopolitical and economic uncertainties are weighing on confidence. We call on the World Bank Group (WBG) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to work jointly with countries to enhance synergy among monetary, fiscal and structural reform policies, stimulate growth, create jobs, and strengthen the gains from multilateralism for all.

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Global Economic Prospects

The World Bank Group published its Global EcInfographiconomic Prospects (GEP) report yesterday, January 13, 2015.

After growing by an estimated 2.6 percent in 2014, the global economy is projected to expand by 3 percent this year, 3.3 percent in 2016 and 3.2 percent in 2017, predicts the Bank’s twice-yearly flagship. Developing countries grew by 4.4 percent in 2014 and are expected to edge up to 4.8 percent in 2015, strengthening to 5.3 and 5.4 percent in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

“In this uncertain economic environment, developing countries need to judiciously deploy their resources to support social programs with a laser-like focus on the poor and undertake structural reforms that invest in people,” said World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim. “It’s also critical for countries to remove any unnecessary roadblocks for private sector investment. The private sector is by far the greatest source of jobs and that can lift hundreds of millions of people out of poverty.”

Read the World Bank press release here.