Partnering for green, resilient and inclusive development in Tanzania

I had the opportunity to visit Tanzania last month, my first mission to Africa since joining the World Bank. It was a long-awaited trip, as I wanted to see for myself what more we can do to support countries that are striving to recover from COVID-19. Coming from Indonesia, I also thought there were experiences that I could share from my own country’s development.

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Development in a Time of Upheaval: Speech by World Bank Group President David Malpass

Ahead of the World Bank Group-IMF Annual Meetings, President Malpass delivers a speech in Khartoum, Sudan, entitled “Development in a Time of Upheaval. ” President Malpass will set out the major challenges and opportunities in building a resilient and inclusive recovery for all. He will look at the dynamics of recent global economic growth that have contributed to inequality and a reversal in development progress. President Malpass will also explore how to remove or confront obstacles to development such as high debt, high trade costs, and the diminished capacity of many middle-income countries following COVID-19.  

The speech will be followed by a moderated discussion.

From crisis to resilience: World Bank Group Spring Meetings to focus on helping countries build a green and resilient recovery

The lingering pandemic has dealt the global economy an unprecedented shock, and the recovery is likely to be slow and uneven. The current crisis is exacerbating inequalities throughout the world and, without access to vaccines, the gap will widen further.

Meanwhile, COVID-19 has made clear the need to establish a better way to handle the debt-financing needs of developing economies. And for a sustainable future, solutions are most urgently needed in developing countries, where the investment gap is deepest, and people are most disproportionately impacted by the climate crisis. So, what will it take to shape a resilient recovery that works for people and the planet?

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One Year Into The COVID-19 Pandemic, Six Stories That Inspire Hope

March 11 marks one year since COVID-19 was officially declared a pandemic. While the past year has been tremendously challenging, there have been remarkable stories of human resilience, ingenuity, and creativity. On this grim anniversary, we wanted to bring you stories from around the world that inspire. The following six stories are not billion-dollar projects, but the tales of everyday entrepreneurship and innovation happening on a small scale with a big impact. The World Bank Group is continuing to support the poorest countries as they look to a build a sustainable, resilient, and inclusive recovery.

1. Lao PDR: Unlocking the Full Potential of Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprise

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Vorachith Keoxayavong

Reversing Setbacks to Poverty Reduction Requires Nations to Work Together for a Resilient Recovery

17-year-old M’Balu Tucker was poor even before the pandemic. She lives in Sierra Leone, a NewPoorInfographic1080post-conflict country, in a village with only one primary school and a single water tap, not enough to serve all the residents. There is no electricity and the roads are unpaved.

She dreams of furthering her education, moving to the city, and someday working in a bank, so that she can help her family, her village, and her country. But her parents, who are farm workers, sometimes don’t have the money to pay her school fees without taking out a loan.

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World Bank Group Exceeds 2020 Climate Finance Target for 3rd Consecutive Year – $21.4 Billion in Funding for Climate Action

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • In fiscal year 2020, the World Bank Group allocated nearly $21.4 billion to climate-climate-finance-2020-collagerelated investments, surpassing its climate-finance target for the third year in a row.
  • Bank Group climate finance exceeded $83 billion over the 5 years that the first Climate Change Action Plan (2016-2020) was in effect.
  • Three country snapshots illustrate ways in which climate change considerations were integrated into projects in Malawi, Bangladesh and Tunisia.

Across Africa, disaster risk finance is putting a resilient future within reach

Sub-Saharan Africa knows more than its fair share of disasters induced by natural across-africa-disaster-risk-finance-is-putting-a-resilient-future-within-reach-780x439.jpghazards. The past few months alone have seen drought in the Horn of Africa, floods in Mali and Rwanda, and landslides in Ethiopia and Uganda. Between 2005 and 2015, the region experienced an average of 157 disasters per year, claiming the lives of roughly 10,000 people annually.

Disasters can have a debilitating impact on countries’ growth and development prospects. Losses from disasters are only expected to rise as the impacts of climate change intensify across the region. Given these challenges, governments have often been reliant on external aid and budget reallocation to pay for disaster recovery. However, this financing strategy comes at a cost. Uncertainty and delays in aid flows tend to complicate planning for relief and recovery efforts, and budget reallocations can divert funding from vital development programs.

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Managing urban forced displacement to build resilient communities

Globally, around 68.5 million people have fled their homes from conflict or persecution untitled.pngeither as refugees, internally displaced persons, or asylum seekers. Contrary to what some may think, most of the displaced people don’t live in camps. In fact, it’s estimated that about 60%–80% of the world’s forcibly displaced population lives in urban areas.

The “urban story” of forced displacement is often compounded by its hidden nature. Compared to those displaced in camps, it is more difficult to track the living conditions of those displaced in urban areas, obtain precise numbers, and many are not recipients of humanitarian assistance.

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eC2: Building Energy Resilient Power Systems in the Caribbean

Deadline: 23-Aug-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) energy

The World Bank is currently working with Saint Lucia (SLU) and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) in the Caribbean to help improve the resilience of the power systems of these two countries to extreme weather events that will become more severe due to climate change. The World Bank will offer similar support to three other OECS countries afterwards. These Terms of Reference (TOR) are for a Power System Engineering Consulting Firm to support the World Bank energy team by conducting an assessment of the impacts of past storms (2 -3) on the power systems of SLU, SVG, St. Kitts and Nevis (SKN), and Antigua and Barbuda (A&B), identifying key risks and vulnerabilities, and offering energy resilience enhancement recommendations associated with utility power generation assets as well as transmission and distribution systems. The consulting firm will also develop an investment plan with the estimated cost of these recommended measures.

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