Across Africa, disaster risk finance is putting a resilient future within reach

Sub-Saharan Africa knows more than its fair share of disasters induced by natural across-africa-disaster-risk-finance-is-putting-a-resilient-future-within-reach-780x439.jpghazards. The past few months alone have seen drought in the Horn of Africa, floods in Mali and Rwanda, and landslides in Ethiopia and Uganda. Between 2005 and 2015, the region experienced an average of 157 disasters per year, claiming the lives of roughly 10,000 people annually.

Disasters can have a debilitating impact on countries’ growth and development prospects. Losses from disasters are only expected to rise as the impacts of climate change intensify across the region. Given these challenges, governments have often been reliant on external aid and budget reallocation to pay for disaster recovery. However, this financing strategy comes at a cost. Uncertainty and delays in aid flows tend to complicate planning for relief and recovery efforts, and budget reallocations can divert funding from vital development programs.

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Managing urban forced displacement to build resilient communities

Globally, around 68.5 million people have fled their homes from conflict or persecution untitled.pngeither as refugees, internally displaced persons, or asylum seekers. Contrary to what some may think, most of the displaced people don’t live in camps. In fact, it’s estimated that about 60%–80% of the world’s forcibly displaced population lives in urban areas.

The “urban story” of forced displacement is often compounded by its hidden nature. Compared to those displaced in camps, it is more difficult to track the living conditions of those displaced in urban areas, obtain precise numbers, and many are not recipients of humanitarian assistance.

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eC2: Building Energy Resilient Power Systems in the Caribbean

Deadline: 23-Aug-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) energy

The World Bank is currently working with Saint Lucia (SLU) and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) in the Caribbean to help improve the resilience of the power systems of these two countries to extreme weather events that will become more severe due to climate change. The World Bank will offer similar support to three other OECS countries afterwards. These Terms of Reference (TOR) are for a Power System Engineering Consulting Firm to support the World Bank energy team by conducting an assessment of the impacts of past storms (2 -3) on the power systems of SLU, SVG, St. Kitts and Nevis (SKN), and Antigua and Barbuda (A&B), identifying key risks and vulnerabilities, and offering energy resilience enhancement recommendations associated with utility power generation assets as well as transmission and distribution systems. The consulting firm will also develop an investment plan with the estimated cost of these recommended measures.

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Building sustainable financing and resilient systems for health security in East Asia and the Pacific

blog-toomas-image001The East Asia and Pacific  region is vital to global pandemic preparedness. The region has been the epicenter of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. China and Southeast Asia alone accounted for approximately 90 percent of SARS cases and two-thirds of the human cases of avian influenza in the world. These outbreaks are driven by several socio-economic, demographic, environmental, and ecological factors, including close contact between humans and animals, encroachment with wildlife, high population density, rapid urbanization, high growth rates, and climate change.

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Aftershocks: Remodeling the Past for a Resilient Future

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eC2:GEOHAZARD RISK MANAGEMENT AND RESILIENT ROAD ASSET MANAGEMENT IN BANGLADESH

untitledDeadline:  12-May-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Objective: The proposed project adopts a systematic approach to assist the Governments of Bangladesh to determine their climate and seismic risks of geo hazard in transport sector. Landslides in Bangladesh have been considered relatively minor compared to flooding. However, with the recent intensified rainfalls during monsoon and unplanned hill cuttings and deforestation in the hill tracts areas, the number of landslides costing people’s lives and properties has been increased in this decade. The project will assess the climate and seismic risks of the roads in Sylhet and Chittagong Hill Tract Districts and identify the highest impact/hot spot areas. Once the priority hotspots are identified, detailed site specific risk assessments will be made and detailed planning process will be conducted with all the relevant specialized agencies. The determination of the hot spots will be done looking at historical evidence on the landscape over time, rainfall data, traffic volume and use by the local communities. Consultations will be conducted with the Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) and other relevant departments including Road Highway Department (RHD). Duration of the assignment is 10 months.

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