Three criteria to better classify PPPs in Africa

14114018832_e77c929548_kIt is broadly understood that public-private partnerships (PPP) are a procurement tool that encompass design, financing, construction and long-term operation of a public infrastructure by the private sector. They can be cost-effective thanks to adequate risk transfer and performance criteria, and help bridge Africa’s large infrastructure gap in many sectors.

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eC2: Communication Consultant – Banjul Port PPP

public-Private-PartnershipDeadline: 21-May-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The Government of the Gambia (GoTG) wishes to implement a public private partnership (PPP) to rehabilitate, operate and develop the Port of Banjul. Established in 1972, the Port is managed by the Gambia Port Authority (GPA) and is currently operating as service port. It accounts for almost 90% of the countrys trade and serves as a secondary regional hub, with volumes going to the hinterland (Southern Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Guinea and Western Mali). Throughput has grown substantially in the past decade, with a compounded annual growth rate of 7.3%. between 2007 and 2017 and 105,000 TEUs in 2017.

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eC2:Technical Assistance on Project Screening and Prioritization and Outline Business Cases (OBCs) Development for PPPs in Infrastructure Sector

Deadline: 30-May-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) PPPs

Description: The objectives are to provide technical assistance and advisory services to BAPPENAS Directorate of PPP and Financial Engineering, specifically on: (a) PPP project screening and prioritization; and (b) development of outline business cases (OBCs) for selected PPP projects. The technical assistance under this TA will be structured into two main activities: (i) project screening and prioritization; and (ii) development of OBCs. The activity outcomes are to screen and prioritize the projects and expected to feed into the subsequent OBCs development for the most priority projects.
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eC2: Technical and E&S consultant – Banjul Port PPP

PPPsDeadline: 15-May-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Objective: – Analyses of technical and operational aspects of GPA benchmarked against comparable ports in the region and best practice, including infrastructure, superstructure, commercial and financial aspects – Analyses on the technical aspects related to an institutional reorganization/ realignment of GPA to consider the introduction of a private sector entity – Environmental and social analyses, including scoping studies of possible environmental and social impact and mitigation measures, as well as stakeholders engagement planning, aligned on IFC Performance Standards. Tasks will also include the identification of issues associated with the project, related gaps, and proposed roadmap to close such gaps in order to develop the project in line with national legislation and the IFC Performance Standards. – Analyses and assistance in social aspects: including a review and recommendations of staffing at GPA and the distribution of staff with the future Operator; the possible options and recommendations on ways to include / consider the 400+ dockers at the Port Banjul, who, today have an undefined status at the Port.

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eC2: Technical Consultant – Jamaica Solid Waste – Options Analysis

solid wasteDeadline:  30-Apr-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Objective: The objective of the assignment is for the Technical Consultant to assist IFC in its work for Phase 0 Options Analysis. The Technical Consultant will analyse the main aspects of the project, including assessment of the appropriate form of private sector participation, defining the options for an integrated waste management plan for the entire island, quantifying the cost of such options, identifying the main regulatory and legal requirements for its implementation and together with IFC assess the market interest in the proposed options. The recommended options shall be in line with IFC Environmental and Social Performance Standards that will be made available to the Consultant as part of their work. Should the GoJ decide to proceed with the implementation of the proposed options, the next phase will advance with the structuring of the PPP transaction and drafting of the technical and applicable commercial terms for the tender documents, including the PPP contract, negotiations with bidders, and supporting the implementation the tender process.

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Keep up with the latest trends on PPPs

It seems like every week there are new reports being published about public-private modern city with highway interchange partnerships (PPPs) by different organizations around the world. How can you keep track of what’s new and what’s relevant for your work?

With over 4,000 documents on PPPs in seven different languages (English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Arabic, Russian, and Chinese) in its searchable document library, the PPP Knowledge Lab has become a key resource for the PPP community to keep up to date with the latest on PPPs.

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Report: Policy Guidelines for Managing Unsolicited Proposals in Infrastructure Projects – Volume 1

untitledWhen it comes to infrastructure projects, “unsolicited proposals” (USPs) represent an alternative to the traditional project initiation method where the private sector, rather than the government, takes the leading role in identifying and developing a project. In practice, many public authorities across the world resort to USPs motivated by the perspective of solving the challenges brought by their lack of capacity to identify and develop projects. However, many projects that originate as USPs experience challenges, including diverting public resources away from the strategic plans of the government, providing poor value for money, and leading to patronage and lack of transparency, particularly in developing countries. To ensure governments can mobilize the strengths of the private sector while protecting the public interest, USPs, when accepted, should be managed and used with caution as an exception to the public procurement method.

Main Findings & Recommendations 

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Infrastructure & Africa’s development—the PPP imperative

Africa is a continent rich in natural resources and boasts a large young, ambitious, and entrepreneurial-minded population. Harnessed properly, these endowments and advantages could usher in a period of sustained economic growth and increased well-being for all Africans. However, a lack of modern infrastructure is a major challenge to Africa’s economic development and constitutes a significant impediment to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

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Mobilizing Islamic Finance for Infrastructure Public-Private Partnerships

This PPIAF-funded report aims to discuss and disseminate information on how Islamic finance has been applied in infrastructure projects through PPP schemes, what the structural challenges and solutions are, and what can be done to deepen and maximize the use of Islamic finance for this purpose. This report has two broad dimensions. The first is to enhance the understanding of Islamic finance building blocks as they relate to financing infrastructure PPP projects, and the second, and perhaps less well understood, is to explore how the building blocks of Islamic finance can fit within a PPP context. This report paves the way for providers of Islamic finance capital to become partners in infrastructure development and thus contribute to its overall global financing pool. Read the full report here.

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PPP & Infrastructure: A critical piece of the infrastructure puzzle

A major factor hindering infrastructure implementation and delivery is the absence of good governance, according to the 130 delegates from 27 countries who came together for the first Regional Roundtable on Infrastructure Governance in Cape Town in November.

There’s no denying infrastructure is crucial to Africa’s growth prospects. Nor can one ignore the ever-growing need for infrastructure on the continent—in Sub-Saharan Africa, only 35% of the population has access to electricity, and 23% still lack access to safe water and sanitation. Despite an estimated shortfall of nearly $100 billion in infrastructure investment in Africa, lack of financing is not the biggest problem.

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