Some reflections on pathways out of poverty

Take two numbers: 1 in 3 young people worldwide are not in education, employment or World Bank buildingtraining, and over 875 million people are expected to migrate by 2050.

These figures often reflect unfulfilled aspirations and lack of opportunity.

People are often in jobs with below poverty-line pay; others have no prospects for a raise and professional advancement; for some others, it is hard to re-enter the job market after a period of unemployment; and, among the youngest, many face daunting obstacles in joining the workforce.

Fair Progress? Economic Mobility across Generations Around the World

If you are born into a low-income family, what are the chances that you will rise higher Fair-Progress-Pictureregardless of your background? The ability to move up the income ladder, both in one’s lifetime and with respect to one’s parents, matters for fighting poverty, reducing inequality, and even for boosting growth. Yet, mobility has stalled in recent years in large parts of the world, with the prospects of too many people across the world still too closely tied to their parents’ social status rather than their own potential, according to the findings of a new World Bank report launched today. Mobility is also much lower, on the average, in developing economies than in high-income economies. The developing world accounts for 46 of the bottom 50 economies in terms of mobility in education from the bottom to the top.

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The State of Social Safety Nets 2018

safety-nets-2018-report-cover-1Safety nets protect vulnerable households from impacts of economic shocks, natural disasters, and other crises

  • An estimated 36 percent of the very poor escaped extreme poverty because of social safety nets, providing clear evidence that social safety net programs are making a substantial impact in the global fight against poverty.
  • In developing and transition countries, 2.5 billion people are covered by safety net programs. Of these, 650 million people are from the poorest quintile.
  • Yet, in low-income countries, only 1 in 5 of the poorest are covered by safety net programs.

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eC2: Regional households survey on poverty and health in Senegal

Deadline:  09-Apr-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) medical-appointment-doctor-healthcare-clinic-health-hospital-medicine[7]

Objective:  The Household Survey: Building on the questionnaire already developed for the forthcoming LSMS survey in Senegal (shortened version), the household survey will collect comprehensive and multi-purpose household data, including specific modules on health (health expenditures, financial protection, as well as a short module on adolescent health). Administering this survey tool through the CAPI (Computer Assisted Personal Interview) software developed by the World Bank (Survey Solution), the survey is expected to cover approximately 2100 households distributed across three regions and representative at the departmental level.

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World Bank Urges Action to Break the Cycle of Poverty from Generation to Generation

WASHINGTON, October 17, 2017 — The social status of one’s parents is as influential today as it was 50 years ago in determining a person’s future, according to early findings from an upcoming World Bank report, Fair Progress? Educational Mobility Around the World. Marking the 25th anniversary of the International Day to Eradicate Poverty, the institution sounded the alarm on a lack of progress since the 1960s in an area that is crucial for reducing poverty and inequality and promoting growth.

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The Tech Revolution That’s Changing How We Measure Poverty

Article published on http://www.worldbank.org on July 27, 2017.

The world has an ambitious goal to end extreme poverty by 2030. But, without good poverty data, it is impossible to know whether we are making progress, or whether programs and policies are reaching those who are the most in need.

 

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