Unleashing the economic power of women

By David Malpass, President World Bank Group
March 3, 2020

Girls are attending school in greater numbers than ever before, and women are girls-education-women-empowermentincreasingly entering the labor force and leading businesses. Although we should celebrate this progress, much work remains in order for a girl born today to have the same opportunities as a boy.

Research from the World Bank and others shows that unleashing the economic power of women can contribute to global growth.  Moreover, it is the right thing to do. Fortunately, more countries recognize that economies can reach their full potential only with the full participation of both women and men.

The World Bank Group is supporting countries in achieving this goal in important areas, including the removal of discriminatory laws, investment to close gender gaps, broadening access to finance, and stepping up efforts to prevent gender-based violence.

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eC2: Women Startup/Acceleration Program in High-tech Sector

Deadline: 16-Mar-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

WBGs Advisory Project aims to design and deliver startup/acceleration program for afghanistan-school-gender-girlscompetitively selected women-owned SMEs in high-tech sector in three regions. It will consist of a mix of individual and group mentoring, coaching and technical advisory aimed to improve business skills, investment readiness, and soft skills (negotiation, confidence, pitching, and so on) of beneficiaries as well as access to larger business networks and funding. The program will also include a series of networking events, aimed at expanding women-owned SMEs linkages to financial institutions and new business networks. Particular focus will be placed on creating links between women-owned SMEs and (1) financial institutions to address accessing to finance constraints; and (2) large firms/corporates to facilitate women integration in supply chains and access to business networks. The expected impact is the improved performance of women entrepreneurs in terms of revenue, funding obtained, jobs created.

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eC2: Training for e-commerce and export advisors in Lebanon, Djibouti, and Tunisia

Deadline: 17-Jul-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

This assignment specifically focuses on increasing women-led SMEs access to domestic 1_BkBrs2NfHlP53xw7ZfQ0Pwand export markets through e-commerce, and to increase their sales from e-commerce in Lebanon.

There are two main sub-activities envisaged: (1) scoping and market analysis to understand where are the key challenges and constraints to e-commerce for womens SMEs; and (2) develop and deliver a package of support services to women-led SMEs, in partnership with local stakeholders, that will increase sales, markets and profits via e-commerce.

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eC2: Supporting Women Entrepreneurs in Nigeria: Access to Finance & Markets Diagnostic

Deadline: 21-Jan-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The World Bank will employ the services of a specialized firm to conduct a diagnostic which shall help inform the design of interventions to support women-led SMEs (WSMEs) in Nigeria in accessing finance and markets. Specifically, this assignment includes:

i) Mapping: Gather evidence on target beneficiaries (women entrepreneurs with high growth potential) to develop a diagnostic tool and provide the basis for design of tailored capacity building. This will include a creation of a taxonomy for various types of WSMEs, a targeted database of WSMEs and data collection (targeted survey, focus groups, etc.) to help understand WSMEs’ capacity building needs;

ii) Ecosystem Diagnostic: The ecosystem diagnostic will identify and understand the perspective of the various stakeholders affecting the ability of women entrepreneurs to start and grow a business (investors, customer base, competitors, business associations, business development service providers, government agencies, etc.). Focus groups and interviews will help understand the gap, market and institutional, between what is available and what is required for WSMEs to access finance and take advantage of market opportunities;

iii) Market assessment: Mapping of bank and non-bank providers, products, and regulatory barriers, including for Fintech adoption, to inform design of FinTech solutions/movable asset-based lending, and/or savings products tailored to WSMEs’ needs.

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Equality Means Business: Making the Business Case for Women Charity R. Hodzi-Sibanda’s picture

When early December was upon us—heralding the start of the month of annual festivities—a group of women executives met to put forward strategies for equality in business. They met against a background of the harsh reality of women’s exclusion from leadership positions in Zimbabwe, brought to the fore in a recently released Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries (CZI) Manufacturing Survey for 2017.

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Equality Means Business: Making the Business Case for Women

Despite women’s active role in Zimbabwe’s informal sector, they are underrepresented in its formal business sector.  When early December was upon us—heralding the start of the month of annual festivities—a group of women executives met to put forward strategies for equality in business. They met against a background of the harsh reality of women’s exclusion from leadership positions in Zimbabwe, brought to the fore in a recently released Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries (CZI) Manufacturing Survey for 2017.

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Lessons from the Field: Bangladesh, Mobile Money and Financial Literacy for Women

MFS-Bangladesh_780x439.pngThe World Bank Group’s (WBG) Universal Financial Access 2020 (UFA2020) envisions that all adults worldwide will have access to a transaction account or an electronic instrument to store money, send payments and receive deposits by 2020.

The lack of financial inclusion is a pressing issue in Bangladesh, and women are disproportionately excluded: only 26% of women have accounts at financial institutions. Mobile financial services (MFS) are well positioned to deliver financial services to segments that can prove prohibitively expensive for banks, such as women in rural areas. Despite the strong growth of the mobile financial services (MFS) market, only 6% of women have MFS accounts.   Continue reading

eC2: GAFSP Uganda Poverty Assessment

Deadline: 05-Aug-2017 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

IFC is looking for a Consultant to help assess the impact of an investment project in logo_ifcUganda, financed by IFC and the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program.

The project is expected to be a senior loan to a bank in Uganda focused on the micro and small market segments. The purpose of the project is to support the expansion of the banks lending program to micro enterprises owned by women and in the agriculture sector.

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New World Bank Group Facility to Enable more than $1 billion for Women Entrepreneurship

HAMBURG, Germany, July 8, 2017—On the occasion of the G20 leaders’ summit, the nasikiliza-unleashing-the-potential-of-women-entrepreneurs-in-africa-feature-780x439World Bank Group today announced the creation of an innovative new facility that aims to enable more than $1 billion to advance women’s entrepreneurship and help women in developing countries gain increased access to the finance, markets, and networks necessary to start and grow a business.

The United States initiated the idea for the facility and will serve as a founding member along with other donor countries.

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Why gender equality in doing business makes good economic sense

Article published on http://www.worldbank.org on November 17, 2016.

Women today represent about 50 percent of the world’s population and, for the past two decades, about 50 percent of the labor force. Yet there are stark differences in the outcomes they achieve: Women are only half as likely as men to have a full-time wage-earning job. The women who do have paid jobs earn as much as one-third less than men. Fewer women than men are involved in trade or own registered companies. And women are more likely to work in low-productivity activities or informal employment.

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