eC2: Improving Private Sector Participation in Dhaka Public Transport

Deadline: 24-Jun-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The objective of the consultancy is to support the preparation of Dhaka Public Transport BRTC_double_decker_bus_03652Improvement Project (DPTIP) by i) assessing and improving institutional regulatory framework and client capacity to increase private sector participation in the public transportation sector in Dhaka; and ii) assessing and recommending specific PPP options and business-financial models for the operation of the feeders associated with the BRT line from Gazipur to Mohakhali, for the associated BRT infrastructure and for the operations of the city-wide bus service. The extent of PPP potential must be well assessed and structured based on client capacity, similar experiences in Bangladesh, the relative appetite of banks and investors in Bangladesh to invest in the transport sector (including through the exploration of financing options such as leasing), and the cost/access to finance for private operators and investors.

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eC2: Wastewater Management Facilities for Gazipur City Corporation, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Deadline: 13-May-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Gazipur City Corporation (GCC), Greater Dhaka, with an objective to improve public untitledinfrastructure for wastewater management in the selected areas under its jurisdiction (Zones 1 and 4) plans to develop, operate and maintain following facilities:
– a Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) and a Fecal Sludge Treatment Plant (FSTP);
– a Sewerage Network System (SNS);
– a Centralized Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) for industries; and
– a non-network fecal and sludge removal system in the non-sewerage areas.

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In Bangladesh, new latrines meet a tested business model

In a tiny hamlet called Shinglab in Gazipur district, around 2 hours from Dhaka, you can shamila-bdsee a cluster of homes made of varying materials depending on the household income.

Shamela Hakeem, 40, lives in a functional mud hut with a tin roof. A widow with no children, she makes around BDT 300 ($3.50) daily as a sweeper at a local factory.

Last year, she decided to upgrade her sanitation facilities and purchased a BDT 10,000 ($118) toilet from a local entrepreneur. She is due to pay off her final installment within the next month.

But why did she decide to invest in a toilet?

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Toward Great Dhaka: Seize the golden opportunity

Had you looked across Shanghai’s Huangpu River from west to east in the 1980s, you bangladeshmapwould mostly have seen farmland dotted with a few scattered buildings. At the time, it was unimaginable that East Shanghai, or Pudong, would one day become a global financial centre; that its futuristic skyline, sleek expressways, and rapid trains would one day be showcased in blockbusters like James Bond and Mission Impossible movies! It was also unimaginable that the Shanghainese would consider living in Pudong.

How wrong that would have been! Pudong is now hosting some of the world’s most productive companies, and boosting some of the city’s most desirable neighbourhoods. And Shanghai has become China’s most important global city, lifting the entire hinterland with it.

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Water works: how a simple technology in Dhaka is changing the way people get clean water

Amy Pickering laughs when she thinks of all the things that went wrong with the impact evaluation she recently completed of a water chlorination project in the slums of Bangladesh’s capital city Dhaka: delays, monsoons, and more delays.“It was the hardest project I’ve ever done,” says the seasoned research engineer, now a professor at Tufts University, who was working on a project funded through the World Bank’s Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund.

Clean water is an issue in Dhaka and other overcrowded cities in the region, where contamination by bacteria can lead to high rates of diarrhea, harming children’s growth and health. For Pickering, who specializes in water quality and diarrheal disease, the challenge was finding a water treatment technology that could work without electricity and operate in Dhaka’s extreme weather.

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