Harnessing creativity for change: The art of resilience

Scientists are constantly getting better at knowing when the next hurricane, landslide, or aofr-facebook_0.pngflood will happen. However, science communication about these disasters lags behind. As Leonardo da Vinci described, art has a unique power to communicate this type of knowledge to people everywhere.  

Natural events and disasters of the past have influenced some of the most iconic art of our time. From Turner’s sunsets to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein – both were composed in the shadow of the greatest volcanic eruption of our age, Mount Tambora in 1815. The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Japanese artist Hokusai (c. 1829–33) has been interpreted as a warning about tsunami risk. In an era of increasing natural hazards and climate change, art can also communicate the future risks we face.

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The gender gap in the disaster risk management sector: why it matters

Over the past decade, the practice of disaster risk management (DRM) has evolved and sustainable_communities_v2-200-lowmatured.  From mainly focusing on disaster response, local and international actors alike now emphasize the importance of preparedness and prevention – saving lives and avoiding losses even before disaster strikes.

Yet despite this progress, there’s much more work to be done to ensure that DRM efforts respond to the particular needs and vulnerabilities of women and girls.  In no small part due to gender inequalities, women are both more vulnerable to natural hazards and less likely to benefit from relief and recovery efforts than men.

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eC2: Improving empirical evidence and analytical support on investments in Coastal Resilience in India and Bangladesh

Deadline: 10-Oct-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)blog-in-benin-can-resilient-investment-solutions-save-a-battered-coast-780x439

Assignment Description:  The World Bank aims to apply financing from GFDRR to support efforts to improve the resilience of its coastal areas in India and Bangladesh to enable future investment plans towards building long-term resilience. This technical assistance aims to support the Governments of Bangladesh and India to enhance analytical understanding of past and current interventions, determine lessons learned to assess and improve the quality of resilient investments and improve service delivery of disaster risk management by building and expanding institutional capacities through knowledge exchange and technical and operational collaboration. The expected outcomes of this study are a detailed study assessing past and current coastal resilience interventions (such as multi-purpose cyclone and flood shelters, early warning and dissemination systems, coastal embankments, and community based disaster risk management), cost-benefit analysis of various intervention options, and best practices and lessons learned through data analysis, conceptual/numerical modeling and stakeholder consultations. Also, a comprehensive dissemination strategy will be developed to share the results of the study with the involved agencies, practitioners, and the public in general.

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Building Back Better: How to Cut Natural Disaster Losses by a Third

DgnheipUwAETCjh.jpgWASHINGTON, June 18, 2018When countries rebuild stronger, faster and more inclusively after natural disasters they can reduce the impact on people’s livelihoods and well-being by as much as 31 percent, potentially cutting global average losses from $555 billion to $382 billion per year. That’s the conclusion of a new report from the World Bank and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), released today.

The report, Building Back Better: Achieving resilience through stronger, faster and more inclusive post-disaster reconstruction, assesses socioeconomic resilience and the impact of disasters on people’s well-being. It covers 149 countries, including 17 small island states, representing 95.5 percent of the world’s population.

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Working Together to Weather Future Storms

hydromet-feature-imageSTORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Meteorological and hydrological services – hydromet – play a vital role in mitigating the impacts of weather and climate extremes
  • Hydromet is not only about early warning systems, but also giving countries, regions, communities, and individuals weather information and reliable predictions to make informed decisions for many sectors of the economy – from agriculture to logistics to hydropower, and many more
  • The World Bank and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) are supporting efforts to strengthen collaboration in global weather monitoring across the public and private sectors

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eC2: GFDRR Challenge Fund Data Exploration Tool

Deadline:  07-Sep-2017 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) logo1

GFDRR is supporting the development of an open data schema for hazard, exposure and vulnerability data through the Challenge Fund(https://www.gfdrr.org/challengefund). This Consultancy will support the project by developing software that will allow for extracting a subset of hazard, exposure and vulnerability data from external databases using an API, and then subsequently downloading and interactively analyzing the extracted data. The software should allow the user to save and/or print the analysis results. It should permit a variety of means for exploring and understanding the data. The overall goal is to provide a non-expert user with the ability to simply extract, explore and understand hazard, exposure and vulnerability data relevant to a country or region of interest. The desktop versions should be compatible with common operating systems. The software should be based on open-source software such as R or Python. This will need to be delivered by March 2018.

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eC2: Risk Communication Research for the Open Data for Resilience Initiative

Deadline: 08-Feb-2017 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

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This project seeks to document the third pillar of the work program, Using Data, similar to how OpenDRI has documented its first two pillars through the above publications. This pillar brings together ideas and efforts from the fields of risk communication, user-centered design, and civic technology to ensure that investments in generating, collecting and sharing data contribute to evidence-based and risk-informed policies, ideally causing change in policy and behavior. Further, the third pillar seeks to inform the ways in which OpenDRI designs projects falling under the first two pillars.

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Taking Disaster Risk Management to New Heights

STORY HIGHLIGHTSScreen Shot 2016-10-20 at 10.10.05 AM.png

  • As urbanization rates skyrocket worldwide, cities large and small are grappling with increased disaster risk as infrastructure buckles underneath the weight of rapidly growing populations.
  • In flood-prone Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, public safety officials are working to better protect residents from recurrent flooding, which disproportionately impacts the city’s many makazi holela – unmapped, resource-poor informal settlements.
  • GFDRR is supporting Dar es Salaam’s efforts to secure vulnerable neighborhoods through the Ramani Huria initiative, a community-mapping project that trains university students and local community members on platforms that create open-source maps of the most flood-prone areas of their city. Using novel technologies, including Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), commonly known as drones, volunteers better understand vulnerabilities in their community, and put crucial information in the hands of those who need it most.

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Habitat III—That Once Every 20 Years Global Urban Event

  • Next week the UN Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban DevelopmentPanel--Quito-Financing.jpg—Habitat III—will reinvigorate international commitment to sustainable urbanization.
  • 54 percent of the global population lives in urban areas. Cities can be the drivers of sustainable development, but many are growing so fast they can’t keep up with citizens’ demands for services.
  • The World Bank Group delegation will lead and participate in a number of sessions at Habitat III. GFDRR will present a report about the human and financial cost of disasters and climate change.

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Staying a Step Ahead of a Natural Disaster: Can Innovation and Technology Help?

Last month a 7.8 magnitude earthquake in Ecuador left over 600 people dead and almost ThinkHazard-thirty thousand injured, with economic damages projected at more than $3 billion. Unfortunately, events like these are becoming all too commonplace. Impacts from natural disasters are on the rise, posing a growing threat to economies and the lives of millions of people around the world.

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