Changing impact of weather and climate services in response to changing climate

Have you ever wondered what your national meteorological agency actually does? I weathering_the_change_web-1suppose it wouldn’t be inaccurate to say that they can help you decide how to dress, whether or not to carry an umbrella, or water the garden. But their purpose is so much bigger than that.

National meteorological and hydrological services (NMHSs) are responsible for helping people understand, predict and warn of weather- and water-related hazards such as storms, floods, and hurricanes.

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Working Together to Weather Future Storms

hydromet-feature-imageSTORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Meteorological and hydrological services – hydromet – play a vital role in mitigating the impacts of weather and climate extremes
  • Hydromet is not only about early warning systems, but also giving countries, regions, communities, and individuals weather information and reliable predictions to make informed decisions for many sectors of the economy – from agriculture to logistics to hydropower, and many more
  • The World Bank and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) are supporting efforts to strengthen collaboration in global weather monitoring across the public and private sectors

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Improving Weather Forecasts Can Reduce Losses to Development in Africa

ADDIS-ABABA, September 12 2017‒“Hydromet” or weather, water, and climate servicesafr-improving-weather-forecasts-can-reduce-losses-to-development-in-africa-780x439 affect the decisions people, communities, and governments make every day. A family at their farm, a shopkeeper in a store, or a government worker on a dam, all need accurate, timely information to make well-informed day-to-day decisions. This can come from something as simple a river gauge, which warns of rising water levels, to more advanced weather forecasting systems alerting an entire country of the approach of a cyclone.

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Modernizing weather forecasts and disaster planning to save lives

Article published on http://www.worldbank.org, August 9th, 2016.
By Lisa Finneran

Is it hot outside? Should I bring an umbrella?© Angela Gentile/World Bank

Most of us don’t think much beyond these questions when we check the weather report on a typical day. But weather information plays a much more critical role than providing intel on whether to take an umbrella or use sunscreen. It can help manage the effects of climate change, prevent economic losses and save lives when extreme weather hits.

During the second IDA18 replenishment meeting in Nay Pyi Taw, I visited the Myanmar Department of Meteorology and Hydrology’s Multi-Hazard Early Warning Center to see how funding from IDA, the World Bank’s fund for the poorest, is helping the country modernize its systems for observing and forecasting weather through the Ayeyarwady Integrated River Basin Management Project.

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