Top 7 water blogs of 2017

As a new year of insightful and interesting blogs begins here, we celebrate some of the most popular entries on The Water Blog from 2017.  Thanks to our readers and bloggers, The Water Blog is growing every year. From global, to regional, to national, and local perspectives, and covering key themes that resonate with a diverse community, we strive to ensure our content makes an important contribution to the global dialogue on water issues, and offers readers fresh insights as well as vital resources they otherwise may have not known about.

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Equality Means Business: Making the Business Case for Women

Despite women’s active role in Zimbabwe’s informal sector, they are underrepresented in its formal business sector.  When early December was upon us—heralding the start of the month of annual festivities—a group of women executives met to put forward strategies for equality in business. They met against a background of the harsh reality of women’s exclusion from leadership positions in Zimbabwe, brought to the fore in a recently released Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries (CZI) Manufacturing Survey for 2017.

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Protecting Watersheds Through an Innovative Learning App

Watershed protection is a complex challenge that needs a multi-sectorial approach. Innovative and interactive tools, such as the new World Bank Spatial Agent app, is one solution, according to Nagaraja Rao Harshadeep, a Global Lead for Watersheds with the Bank’s Environment and Natural Resources Global Practice.Harshadeep, also the leader of the Spatial Agent app team, believes the app’s interactive maps and charts can help to us explore multi-sectoral synergies in a spatial development context. The data can promote collaborative efforts for sustainable and environmentally sound watershed management.

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Cities: 12 big moments of building sustainable cities and communities (#7-#12)

At the World Bank, our teams working on social development, urban development, disaster risk management, and land issues have endeavored with countries and cities worldwide throughout the year to achieve a common goal: building inclusive, resilient, and sustainable cities and communities for all. How did they do? From our “Sustainable Communities” newsletter, we have captured 12 moments that mark the major accomplishments and lessons learned in 2017—and inspire our continued work to end extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity in 2018. Below the last 6 moments are described.

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Cities: 12 big moments of building sustainable cities and communities (1-6)

At the World Bank, our teams working on social development, urban development, disaster risk management, and land issues have endeavored with countries and cities worldwide throughout the year to achieve a common goal: building inclusive, resilient, and sustainable cities and communities for all. How did they do? From our “Sustainable Communities” newsletter, we have captured 12 moments that mark the major accomplishments and lessons learned in 2017—and inspire our continued work to end extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity in 2018. Below the first 6 moments are described. Tomorrow will het other 6 moments follow.

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When technology meets agriculture in Bhutan

Bhutan is a challenging environment in which to develop commercial agriculture. The country has limited areas for agriculture, and its geography and road conditions make logistics and market access costly. Therefore, commercial agriculture is critical to increase productivity, which will help create jobs and access to more and better food. This can be achieved not only through focusing on high-value products and investing in traditional infrastructure such as irrigation, but also through using information and communication technology (ICT). Based in eastern Bhutan, Mountain Hazelnuts has developed innovative uses of ICT for its commercial agriculture operations.

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eC2: Resource Efficiency Advisory to Textile Supply Chain Factories

Deadline: 27-Dec-2017 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Objective:  IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest global development supplychaininstitution focused exclusively on the private sector. Working with private enterprises in about 100 countries, we use our capital, expertise, and influence to help eliminate extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity. Addressing climate change mitigation and adaptation are among key missions of IFC.

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ec2: LEBANON OFF-GRID AND SOLAR ENERGY MARKET ASSESSMENT (REFUGEES AND HOST COMMUNITIES)

Deadline: 13-Jan-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Objective: IFC intends to engage a NGO/INGO or a consulting firm (or a combination thereof which forms a consortium led by one member of the consortium) to undertake a field survey to assess the viability of a potential commercial based market for solar energy solutions for refugees and respective host communities which enables improved access to energy services.

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Climate change: Without urgent action, climate impacts could push an additional 100 million people into poverty by 2030

Countries and communities around the world are already experiencing stepped-up  climateclimate change impacts – including droughts, floods, more intense and frequent natural disasters, and sea-level rise – and the most vulnerable are being hit the hardest.

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Meet & Greet the Dutch at the World Bank Group: Rosa Keizer (28)

In order to gain a better idea of how it is like to work at the World Bank Group and how the organization function itself, several Dutch Young Professionals are interviewed at the bank. After the recent interview with Stefan Peuchen, it is now Rosa Keizer’s turn to tell her story on this blog.Rosa.jpg

What is your role within the World Bank?

”As a Young Professional at the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality I had the opportunity to work for both the Dutch Embassy and the World Bank in Washington D.C. My contribution is part of an agreement signed between The Netherlands and the World Bank, where both parties commit to join efforts for increased food security worldwide. My team at the World Bank, with which I work four days a week, is part of the Global Practice Agriculture and is involved in Food Loss and Waste. I spend the remaining day at the Dutch Embassy, briefing with my colleagues involved in the topic and the Dutch ministries. I feel privileged to have this position; by working with two organizations I see my added value in creating synergies which can benefit both the World Bank and the Netherlands.”

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