Countries Could Cut Emissions by 70% by 2050 and Boost Resilience with Annual Investments of 1.4% of GDP

World Cities Day: A spotlight on climate change and health

Climate stressors have pervasive impacts, among which the impact on the health wcd-22.jpg populations across the world continues to expand. This has recently come into even sharper focus with COVID-19.

Extreme heat and water scarcity together, for instance, are already creating havoc in cities like Cape Town and Chennai, while vector-borne, and water-borne diseases like dengue, malaria, gastroenteritis and typhoid continue to affect thousands of cities globally. Apart from their obvious impacts on the physical health of the population, with the oldest, youngest, and other vulnerable groups facing the greatest threats, such climate stressors also have serious mental health ramifications.

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World Bank Group Priorities at COP27

Action and Impact World-Bank-Group-Priorities-COP27

By David Malpass, President, The World Bank Group

Climate change – caused by greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from human activities – poses a major threat to people and development. Poverty, development and climate change need to be tackled together, acknowledging the interconnections between people, planet, and the economy. Climate action is a key global public good, requiring major new financing from the global community and mechanisms for inflows. Mitigation activities are needed to reduce GHG emissions in our shared atmosphere. Adaptation activities need to redouble to reduce the added hunger, migration, conflict, and trade protectionism generated by climate change.  

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World Bank Group at COP27

November 6-18, 2022

GO TO: SCHEDULE OF LIVE EVENTS | RESOURCES ON CLIMATE | FEATURED SPEAKERS

The world will come together in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, for COP27, amid growing urgency to tackle the climate crisis. The United Nations Climate Change Conference is expected to focus on the need to implement climate pledges, scale up climate finance, and address the adaptation needs of developing countries. COP27 will bring together leaders and national delegations, representatives from businesses, multilateral institutions, civil society and youth. The World Bank Group will be there taking part in discussions and live events over two weeks.

Watch this space for a listing of events and set reminders to join us live.

Follow the conversation with: #ClimateActionWBG.

LIVE EVENTS

 

 

Building Resilient Health Systems in the Shadow of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed structural weaknesses in health systems worldwide and 720 x 720.jpgnegatively impacted individuals, societies, and economies. In the pandemic’s wake, political leaders and everyday people alike recognize the importance of resilient health systems that can prevent, prepare for, respond to, and learn from infectious outbreaks and other shocks while continuing to deliver quality essential health services. But urgent questions remain. Which features of a health system are most important for achieving resilience? How can countries—especially poor ones—build resilient health systems? Which investments should countries prioritize to make their systems resilient to future challenges?

Thursday, November 3rd- 8-9AM EDT

EVENT REGISTRATION

This new World Bank report, “Change Cannot Wait: Building Resilient Health Systems in the Shadow of COVID-19,” builds on previous work, leverages new research, and considers countries’ frontline experiences during the pandemic. It presents a new framework for making health systems resilient, shows how countries can build them, and where countries and partners can target investments to improve health outcomes.

 

Empower HER to address food and nutrition security in Africa

Food and nutrition insecurity is escalating across the world.  Food price inflation exceeds 20180510-guinea-tremeau-230_oct_15_2022_1140x500.jpgoverall inflation in most countries, and at least 123 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) will be in food crisis by the end of the year. This is partly due to lack of investments in domestic food production, exacerbated by climatic shocks, the COVID-19 crisis, and impacts of the war in Ukraine.

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