eC2: Formative Research on Baby WASH and Nutrition in Ethiopia

Deadline: 21-Aug-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) wash-hands-98641_640

A key cause of child stunting in low-income settings could be related to asymptomatic gut infections known as environmental enteropathies (EE), caused in part by unhygienic conditions in early childhood. Thus, improvements in sanitation and hygiene conditions from the time of birth may help to prevent or reduce the prevalence of EE, and therefore stunting. Conventional water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions, i.e. improved household toilets, improved drinking water, and handwashing with soap may not fully address these early fecal-oral exposures. For example, animal feces are likely a dominant source of fecal contamination in low-income settings even in areas of high sanitation coverage and low rates of open defecation. Similarly, food hygiene is an often-overlooked contributor to enteric infections in early childhood. Complementary hygiene interventions are needed to address neglected pathways of exposure.

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Is the urban water and sanitation sector frozen in time?

Blog by Caroline van den Berg, World Bank Group

If time travel were possible, and an engineer from the 1860s could travel in time to 2019, sewage_pipes_under_london_19th_century_wellcome_l0000616he (the first female engineer had not graduated yet) would not recognize much of the technology we have today.  Personal computers, cell phones, cars, planes, and antibiotics would probably be unfathomable to him.   But he would definitely recognize our current piped water and sanitation (WSS) infrastructure, as it looks and operates almost exactly the same as it did 150 years ago.  Certainly, there have been significant improvements in the sector, especially in water and wastewater treatment, but the principles on which the piped WSS technology is based have not seen any fundamental changes since the 1860s, when it was (re)introduced on a large scale.

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eC2: Enabling Environment and Development of PPP Framework in Urban Sanitation

Deadline: 20-Dec-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The Water supply and sanitation subsector is among the focus areas that the Federal untitledDemocratic Republic of Ethiopia (FDRE) has considered among the pro poor sectors. With this understanding the World Bank is extending its support through different interventions. The World Bank Group is supporting the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to achieve its national targets set under GTP II through availing resources to different sectors and sub sectors.
One of the major interventions of the World Bank is the support extended to improve the services delivery in Addis Ababa and 22 secondary towns under the Second Urban Water Supply and Sanitation Project (SUWSSP). Implementation of the project is an opportunity to improve sanitation services delivery and water supply in Addis Ababa and in the secondary and regional towns. This project is a logical continuation of the Ethiopian Urban Water Supply and Sanitation project which was closed in December 2017. Unlike the prior projects the SUWSSP has a wider perspective of reaching different segment of the community by adopting City Wide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS) approach. The model provides opportunity to start with understanding the context, planning for cost effective solution, and consultation with end users. Except Addis Ababa, all project beneficiary towns had limited experience of delivering sanitation focused project and their current staffing for sanitation is also limited.
The SUWSSP has three major components (i) Addis Ababa sanitation and operational efficiency improvement, (ii) Secondary cities and towns sanitation, water supply, and operational efficiency improvement, and (iii) Program management (Federal and regional level). The first two components further divided into three sub-components focusing on sanitation services improvement, water utilities performance improvement and utility modernization and institutional capacity strengthening.

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eC2: Formative research and social and behavioral change communication to promote improved water, sanitation and hygiene behaviors in rural

Deadline:  22-Mar-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

Objective:  The objective of the assignment is to assist the MRD and key stakeholders in the rural WASH sector to develop a SBCC package to promote improved WASH behaviors, with a focus on child-centered behaviors that have the potential to reduce child stunting. The WASH behaviors to be included in the SBCC package consist of (i) promoting latrine adoption among rural households, (ii) promoting Handwashing with Soap (HWWS) among caretakers and children, and (iii) promoting correct Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS) for drinking and for preparing infant formula and food. To achieve the above objectives, the assignment requires completion of the following tasks: 1) conducting spot research on behavior related to HWWS of caretakers and children; and HWTS for drinking and for preparation of infant formula and weaning foods; 2) developing an overarching umbrella concept and brand to be used for all future WASH campaigns; and 3) developing a package of behavior-specific SBCC materials to promote latrine adoption, correct HWWS and HWTS.

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Towards a cleaner Bangladesh: Safe water, sanitation, and hygiene for all

Community-Led Total Sanitation might be the greatest Bangladeshi export you’ve never heard of.  In countries across Asia, Africa and lgsp1Latin America, a consensus has emerged that the best approach is Community-Led Total Sanitation, which is widely credited with changing people’s behavior around the world to no longer defecate in the open, which has greatly improved global health.
Bangladeshis can take plenty of pride in these far-away accomplishments. That’s because it is Northern Bangladesh – more specifically the Mosmoil village in Rajshahi district – that pioneered this approach seventeen years ago. Its success at home led to its widespread adoption abroad.

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Millions Around the World Held Back by Poor Sanitation and Lack of Access to Clean Water

New World Bank research from 18 countries shows urgent action on water and sanitation is key to tackle poverty 

STOCKHOLM, August 28, 2017– Reaching the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of wateraccess to safely managed water and sanitation services by 2030 will require countries to spend $150 billion per year.  A fourfold increase in water supply, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) investments compared to what is spent today, this is out of reach for many countries, threatening progress on poverty eradication.

A World Bank report launched today at World Water Week titled Reducing Inequalities in Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene in the Era of the Sustainable Development Goals suggests that a drastic change is required in the way countries manage resources and provide key services, starting with better targeting to ensure they reach those most in need, and tackling inefficiencies to make sure public services are sustainable and effective.

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World Bank Helps Bangladesh Improve Water and Sanitation Services in Chittagong

On August 6, 2017, The government of Bangladesh signed an additional $47.50 million Bangladesh partnershipfinancing agreement with the World Bank to continue construction of new water infrastructure in Chittagong, and provide access to safe water to around 650,000 inhabitants in the city.

The additional financing to the Chittagong Water Supply Improvement and Sanitation Project will help the Chittagong Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (CWASA) to complete constructing the Modunaghat Water Treatment Plant and Patenga Booster Pumping Station, as well as to install 60 km of new water transmission pipeline and rehabilitate another 73 km pipeline from Kalurghat to the Patenga Booster Pumping Station.

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Netherlands invests in New Partnership that Aims to Help Countries Achieve a Water-Secure World for All

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Water is a crucial aspect of development.Image
  • The Global Water Security & Sanitation Partnership launches July 1st.
  • The Partnership identifies sustainability, inclusion, institutions, financing and resilience as crucial for delivering the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Water touches nearly every aspect of development. It drives economic growth, supports healthy ecosystems and is fundamental for life. However, this critical resource can harm as well as help. Water-related hazards such as floods, storms, and droughts are responsible for 9 out of 10 natural disasters.  Climate change is expected to increase this risk and place even greater stress on scarce water supplies.

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Chickens don’t use toilets: Why we should deal with animal feces for better sanitation

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<!– <!– /sites/all/themes/blogs/templates/header/js/jquery-1.4.4.min.js –>Those who have tried toilet training a pet dog or cat know that it is a difficult proposition.

Raising poultry

How about toilet training a flock of 30 chickens?

“Why would I want to?” Because in poor countries, chickens are everywhere, they are pooping wherever they want, and chicken feces is dangerous for young children.

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eC2: Impact Evaluation WASH and Cash Transfer in Niger

Deadline: 04-Jan-2017 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The World Bank is seeking a firm to prepare and undertake baseline data collection for awater long-term impact evaluation survey in Niger. The survey is a large-scale and complex survey. The sample will include approximately 3,500 households. The instruments will include a household survey that will be provided by the World Bank team and will include anthropometrics measurement of children under 5 years of age and water quality testing.
Baseline data is expected to be collected in approximately 150 villages in Dosso, Maradi, Zinder, Tillaberi and Tahoua. The data collection is expected to take place in late February/ early March 2017.

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