Paying for development – Governments are sitting on a ‘goldmine’

Four years have passed since the launch of the 2030 Agenda and its 17 Sustainable sceneDevelopment Goals. Mobilizing the necessary resources remains central to its success. Investments in human, social, and physical capital are at the core of sustainable and inclusive growth – and represent an important share of national budgets.

At the World Bank Group we have been at the forefront of the so-called Financing for Development (FfD) agenda to leverage public, private, international, and domestic sources of capital to help reach the global goals.  A short primer on our efforts–which builds on the 2015 Development Committee paper Billions to Trillions – Transforming Development Finance–can be found in the brochure entitled Financing for Development at the World Bank Group.

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The Netherlands, World Bank join forces to boost domestic resource mobilization in Africa, the Middle East

WASHINGTON DC, APRIL 11th, 2019.- Senior representatives of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the World Bank today signed an agreement for USD 7,000,000 to Signing TF Reina Buijssupport developing countries’ efforts in mobilizing much-needed public domestic resources to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, particularly in Africa and the Middle East.

The four-year agreement aims at boosting domestic resource mobilization while strengthening tax policy and administrative capacity in selected countries in North, Western, and Central Africa, as well as in the Middle-East. Some countries that may benefit from this agreement include: Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Côte D’Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Ethiopia, Kenya, Iraq, Jordan, and Lebanon.

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Measuring the statistical capacity of nations

Improving the capacity of national statistical systems (NSSs) has long been a part of the chart_0global development agenda. The NSSs play an important role in modern economies. They provide stakeholders, ranging from policy makers to stock market analysts and the general public, with the data on the country’s socioeconomic developments. At the international level, monitoring global initiatives such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires high-quality data that are produced consistently across different national statistical systems.

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Why investors must take a chance in the world’s most fragile countries

untitledFragility, conflict and violence affect more than two billion people across the globe. And while poverty on the whole is declining, that’s not the case in countries affected by conflict. It is these countries plagued by near-constant political and economic instability that are often the ones most in need of private investment. Yet they are also the places few private investors are willing to go. The risks seem to outweigh the rewards.

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Millions Around the World Held Back by Poor Sanitation and Lack of Access to Clean Water

New World Bank research from 18 countries shows urgent action on water and sanitation is key to tackle poverty 

STOCKHOLM, August 28, 2017– Reaching the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of wateraccess to safely managed water and sanitation services by 2030 will require countries to spend $150 billion per year.  A fourfold increase in water supply, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) investments compared to what is spent today, this is out of reach for many countries, threatening progress on poverty eradication.

A World Bank report launched today at World Water Week titled Reducing Inequalities in Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene in the Era of the Sustainable Development Goals suggests that a drastic change is required in the way countries manage resources and provide key services, starting with better targeting to ensure they reach those most in need, and tackling inefficiencies to make sure public services are sustainable and effective.

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The Tech Revolution That’s Changing How We Measure Poverty

Article published on http://www.worldbank.org on July 27, 2017.

The world has an ambitious goal to end extreme poverty by 2030. But, without good poverty data, it is impossible to know whether we are making progress, or whether programs and policies are reaching those who are the most in need.

 

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Putting women’s health and empowerment at the center of development

Last week on World Population Day, I was thinking of the joy of children and the right of babieswomen to decide when to have them. It matters to women, but it matters to society as a whole. There can be no sustainable development without women’s empowerment, and there can be no women’s empowerment without access to comprehensive maternal and reproductive health services. Family planning is part of them.

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Report: Global Road Safety Facility

Since its launch in March 2016, as a global road safety fund, the GRSF had focused on GRSP_logo_web_250pxgetting maximum value for the use of its donor funds by making a difference in how we invest in road safety. This is in line with our Strategic Objectives of developing capacity for sustainability in road safety results, promoting a global network of road safety funding, coordination and advocacy mechanisms, and leveraging development bank projects, particularly those of the GRSF host organization, the World Bank.

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A new role for development banks?

Earlier this month, development banks from around the world took stock of where they infrastructure2stand and where they see their efforts having the greatest impact at a meeting organized by the World Bank and Brazil’s development bank, BNDES.

As the world struggles to find funds to meet the Sustainable Development Goals, development banks can be instrumental in narrowing that gap. They can help to crowd-in the private sector and anchor private-public sector partnerships, particularly for infrastructure financing.

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Well-Designed Early Childhood Development Programs Can Pay Big Dividends

STORY HIGHLIGHTSearly-childhood-development-

  • 250 million children under the age of five suffer from stunting and extreme poverty.
  • The rate of return on investing in a package of nutrition interventions at scale is estimated at 17 percent.
  • Well-designed early childhood development programs include a focus on quality, complementarities between interventions, and behavioral change.

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