Time to ACT! Realizing Indonesia’s urban potential

Indonesia has been transformed by urbanization. As a new World Bank report titled ju210722Time to ACT: Realizing Indonesia’s Urban Potential shows, when its independence was proclaimed in 1945, only one in eight Indonesians lived in towns and cities, and the country’s entire urban population stood at about 8.6 million, roughly that of London today. By contrast, today about 151 million, or 56% of Indonesians live in urban areas, roughly 18 times the population of London.

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Managing urban forced displacement to build resilient communities

Globally, around 68.5 million people have fled their homes from conflict or persecution untitled.pngeither as refugees, internally displaced persons, or asylum seekers. Contrary to what some may think, most of the displaced people don’t live in camps. In fact, it’s estimated that about 60%–80% of the world’s forcibly displaced population lives in urban areas.

The “urban story” of forced displacement is often compounded by its hidden nature. Compared to those displaced in camps, it is more difficult to track the living conditions of those displaced in urban areas, obtain precise numbers, and many are not recipients of humanitarian assistance.

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3 Big Ideas to Achieve Sustainable Cities and Communities

2-Three big ideas, countless solutions

At the World Urban Forum, the World Bank will offer three big ideas that are essential for successfully implementing the New Urban Agenda:

  1. Financing the New Urban Agenda
  2. Promoting territorial development
  3. Enhancing urban resilience to climate change and disaster risks

The Bank will also be showcasing some of the innovative knowledge and transformative actions that have proven to help end extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity in cities around the world.

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Somali Authorities Make Urban Resilience a Priority

STORY HIGHLIGHTSso-somali-authorities-make-urban-resilience-a-priority-780x439

  • The Government of Somalia is ramping up their efforts to increase urban resilience with the aim of reducing instability.
  • Local governments across the country are spearheading inclusive urban development with the help of the World Bank.
  • Preparations are underway for a larger scale, World Bank supported infrastructure project

eC2: Development of Climate Change Mitigation pathways in Energy and Urban sectors

Deadline: 25-Jul-2017 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

PSLO Energy Mission to Washington

Interested firm/consortium should have experience and expertise in climate change mitigation, particularly in the energy and urban sectors. The firm/consortium is required to demonstrate (i) proven international experience (with concrete examples) in assessment and development of mitigation options, scenarios, modelling techniques, baselines and emission factors development, required for the energy sector and desirable for the urban sector; (ii) technical experience and expertise in energy and urban sectors; (iii) local presence in Middle-East region, preferably in Jordan with management staff and local technical experts with Arabic language skills; (iv) experience working with government agencies and multi-lateral and international institutions.

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A New Plan to Support Action on Climate Change in the Arab World

STORY HIGHLIGHTSMena_water_crisis.jpg
  • The Middle East and North Africa region is already suffering the consequences of climate change, and will be hit especially hard by the ongoing rise in global temperatures.
  • Countries in the region are aware of their vulnerabilities and have begun taking action to confront the impacts of climate change, but the challenges are enormous.
  • The World Bank Group has launched a new plan for the region that will increase the portion of financing dedicated to climate action, provide more support for adaptation and focus on protecting the poorest that are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

City Partnership Program (CPP) Launched to Foster “Best Practice” Approaches to Urban Development

Tokyo, March 23, 2016 – Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), partnership project of Japan and the World Bank Group, launched City Partnership Program (CPP) which aims to accelerate the urban development in developing countries by utilizing Japanese expertise on 6 key thematic areas: urban planning, urban service provision, urban management, social development, disaster risk management, and municipal finance.

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China: Keeping the Water and Environment Clean in the Qiangtang River Basin

The article was published on the World Bank website the 29th of February. Qiangtang River Basin

Qiangtang River is the largest river in China’s Zhejiang Province, providing drinking water for most of the 15 million people living in the river basin. It is called the “Mother River” of Zhejiang.

In the last few decades, with rapid economic growth, huge volumes of untreated wastewater and solid waste were dumped into the river, polluting the water and environment. This in turn poses a serious threat to the living conditions and the safety of drinking water of a large number of urban and rural residents.

While larger cities have made good progress in improving environmental services in recent years, small towns are lagging behind. Water supply is estimated to be safe in only 29% of Zhejiang’s small towns. Wastewater treatment coverage rate in small towns is only 26%. Sanitary solid waste disposal facilities are almost non-existent.

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A New Approach to Cities: Everyone Counts

Featured story on the World Bank website, October 29, 2015. Click here to go to WB page.

What does it mean to make a city inclusive?

For Bui Thi Mai in Ho Chi Mihn City, Vietnam, it means a clean, safe street so her business can grow and prosper.India building

“The alley was so narrow that only one motorbike could get in,” she said. “There was no drainage so it was often flooded, making garbage float and mosquitos breed. It was unsafe for our health. There were few streetlights, allowing criminals to hide in dark corners. Running my business is much easier because the street is cleaner and safer. Trucks can carry goods to my door. More shops and restaurants are opening along this big street.”

For Esperanza Choquehuanca, it means participating in community-driven development that brought running water, paved roads, street lighting, sports areas and a community house to her neighborhood on the outskirts of La Paz, Bolivia.

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