World Refugee Day 2019: Building a stronger international response to the challenge of forced displacement

This year, World Refugee Day finds me in Addis Ababa with representatives from more ethiopia-for-blogthan 50 governments to review the work of the International Development Association (IDA), the arm of the World Bank Group that provides financing to the poorest countries, and discuss priorities for the years ahead. Under its current program, IDA is providing $2 billion to 14 low-income countries which together are hosting 6.4 million refugees, including in Ethiopia. 

Ethiopia is among the countries that is taking major steps forward. Here, for example, we have supported the government in adopting a new legal framework for refugees which will allow them to gradually move out of camps, find jobs, and access education and health services. This is no small measure for the more than 900,000 refugees who are hosted along Ethiopia’s borders with Somalia, Eritrea, Sudan, and South Sudan. It is the difference between having a chance to restart their lives or be condemned to dependency and destitution.

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Managing urban forced displacement to build resilient communities

Globally, around 68.5 million people have fled their homes from conflict or persecution untitled.pngeither as refugees, internally displaced persons, or asylum seekers. Contrary to what some may think, most of the displaced people don’t live in camps. In fact, it’s estimated that about 60%–80% of the world’s forcibly displaced population lives in urban areas.

The “urban story” of forced displacement is often compounded by its hidden nature. Compared to those displaced in camps, it is more difficult to track the living conditions of those displaced in urban areas, obtain precise numbers, and many are not recipients of humanitarian assistance.

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eC2: Forced Displacement and Education: Building the Evidence for What Works

Deadline: 17-Dec-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

The research is expected (i) to collect evidence about promising practices in providing untitledaccess to education and improving learning outcomes for the forcibly displaced and affected host communities (ii) to improve our effectiveness to facilitate the transition and uptake from humanitarian education responses to long-term solutions for sustainable access to quality education for the forcibly displaced. The TORs aims to select an agency with extensive experience in practical, empirically grounded and field-based research as well as operation in education policy preferably in forced displacement context to conduct research on
1) What is the available evidence of the impact, cost, and replicability of education interventions that facilitate the access and retention of displaced students and out of school youth?
2) How can education systems be strengthened to become inclusive and resilient to expand and deliver education services to both displaced and host children and youth?

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eC2: Global Questions on Forced Displacement and Jobs

Deadline: 19-Aug-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

DFID, UNHCR, and the World Bank group have joined forces under a DFID Trust Fund tonasikiliza-unleashing-the-potential-of-women-entrepreneurs-in-africa-feature-780x439 identify questions that are under-researched, of global interest, and highly policy-relevant on the topic of forced displacement and jobs. Within the initiative, the World Banks Jobs Group will fund one or several research projects to advance global knowledge on forced displacement and jobs, regarding (1) the impact of forced displacement on labor markets in host communities, and (2) the impact of jobs interventions in the context of forced displacement.
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