Making infrastructure work for both women and men

Despite decades of progress, the global infrastructure gap is still significant: around untitled940m people live without electricity, 2.2bn lack safely managed water, 4.2bn lack safely managed sanitation facilities and 1bn live more than 2 km away from an all-season road.

This gap has a different meaning for women: infrastructure is not gender-neutral. The gaps in access to good infrastructure—and how it is designed, built and run—affects men and women differently.  For instance, it is well documented that women are responsible for obtaining water for domestic use in most countries, which has a big impact on how they spend their time. In Niger, the average time women and girls spend fetching water adds up to 13 days a year. Lack of access to electricity results in household drudgery for women, due to lack of lighting, electric water pumps and refrigeration. 

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The jobs challenge is bigger than ever in the poorest countries

Over the next decade, close to 600 million people will be looking for jobs, mostly in the The West Africa Agricultural Productivity Program (WAAPP) - Ghanworld’s poorest countries. The South Asia region alone will need to create more than 13 million jobs every year to keep pace with its demographics. In Sub-Saharan Africa, despite a smaller population, the challenge will be even greater—15 million jobs will need to be created each year.

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