As Natural Disasters Rise, Countries Call for Action on Resilient Crisis Recovery Planning

STORY HIGHLIGHTSvn-communitybased-disasterrisk-780x439
  • Each year, natural disasters, compounded by climate change and conflict, cause more than $500 billion in losses
  • Yet governments, supported by the World Bank, increasingly understand that investing in disaster recovery enables them to “build back better”
  • The international community sees the World Reconstruction Conference (WRC3) as a call to action on recovery to make countries even more resilient to disasters

eC2: Cumulative Impact Assessment and Management in the Trishuli River Basin

Deadline: 19-Jun-2017 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) water

The Project aims to facilitate collaborative assessment, monitoring and management of cumulative impacts via the participatory development and implementation of a Trishuli Basin Co-Management Platform (TCMP). The TCMP would be led by a team comprising the IFC, private sector HPP developers and the Government of Nepal – in permanent consultation with potentially affected communities, CSOs, NGOs and other relevant stakeholders. The TCMP is expected to significantly enhance governance in the Trishuli Basin and make planning and development of future HPPs and associated infrastructure more sustainable, efficient and transparent. The TCMP will support the mitigation of potential cumulative environmental and social impacts resulting from multiple or successive developments.
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Pulling the chain: business solutions for managing human fecal waste

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The Water Blog

Private sector investment principles could make the fecal sludge management chain sustainable, says a new report released in time for FSM4

To understand why innovation in fecal sludge management matters, ask yourself this: In 15 years, when almost 5 billion people are using on-site sanitation, solutions like pit latrines and septic tanks, what will the world do with all the fecal waste? About half that many people use onsite sanitation today, and we already have a hard time keeping up.

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Testing water quality: When labs don’t work

Drinking water utilities, water resource management agencies, and environmwater_quality_mason_jarental regulators across the world are required to establish laboratories to test water quality. Proper testing ensures that water is safe for its intended use, whether that be drinking, bathing, fishing, watering crops, or sustaining ecological health. Yet we routinely find poorly-functioning analytical labs. Failure to follow standardized procedures, maintain certification, and perform routine checks for quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) compromises the reliability of lab results. As a result, the data are of limited use for managing water safety.

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What is non-revenue water? How can we reduce it for better water service?

­Blog Article: For more information on this initiative, contact Gerard Soppe (gsoppe@worldbank.org) or Jema Sy (jsy@worldbank.org).water-www-logo-squared

In developing countries, roughly 45 million cubic meters of water are lost daily with an economic value of over US$3 billion per year.

A World Bank study puts the global estimate of physical water losses at 32 billion cubic meters each year, half of which occurs in developing countries. Water utilities suffer from the huge financial costs of treating and pumping water only to see it leak back into the ground, and the lost revenues from water that could have otherwise been sold. If the water losses in developing countries could be halved, the saved water would be enough to supply around 90 million people.

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