Webinar April 9th – COVID-19: Vaccines for Developing Countries

Working toward a green, resilient, and inclusive recovery

At the close of the 2021 Spring Meetings, the Development Committee stressed that strong international coordination is urgently needed to contain the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, resume progress toward development goals, and lay the groundwork for green, resilient, and inclusive development.

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Webinar April 9th – COVID-19: Vaccines for Developing Countries

About the Event: LINK

The rollout of COVID-19 vaccines in developing countries is critical to protecting lives, building human capital, and stimulating economic recovery. The current crisis is exacerbating inequalities throughout the world and, without access to vaccines, the gap will widen further. Ensuring developing countries can access, as well as safely distribute vaccines, calls for strong partnership and cooperation at the national, regional & global levels. This event will explore:  

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Making markets work for all: Unlocking the private sector’s role in supporting refugees

The world is witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record.  Of the more thanifc_kenya_final_edit_0013.jpg 70.8 million forcibly displaced persons worldwide, around 41 million are people who have been displaced from their homes but remain in their home country and nearly 25.9 million are refugees who have fled their countries.

One surprising fact: Some 85 percent of those who fled are hosted not in rich countries, but in developing countries with limited resources.

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Lifelines for Better Development

Published on http://www.worldbank.org, June 19, 2019

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Resilient infrastructure is about people. Particularly in developing countries, Lifelines22--1-infrastructure disruptions are an everyday concern that affects people’s well-being, economic prospects, and quality of life.
  • There is a significant economic opportunity from investing in resilient infrastructure: the overall net benefit of doing so in developing countries would be $4.2 trillion over the lifetime of new infrastructure.
  • For infrastructure investors, governments, development banks and the private sector the message is clear: rather than just spending more, also spend better

Infrastructure is at the heart of lives and livelihoods. It can enable schools and hospitals, businesses and industry, and access to jobs and prosperity. In developing countries, however, disruptions to infrastructure are an everyday concern, reducing opportunities for employment, hampering health and education, and limiting economic growth.

In low and middle-income countries, direct damages from natural hazards to power generation and transport alone cost $18 billion a year, cutting into the already scarce budget of road agencies and power utilities. But the main impact of natural shocks on infrastructure is through the disruptions they impose on people and communities, for instance, businesses unable to keep factories running or use the internet to take orders and process payments; or on the households that don’t have the water they need to prepare meals or on people unable to go to work, send children to school, or get to a hospital.

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New International Partnership Established to Increase the Use of Energy Storage in Developing Countries

A global partnership convened by the World Bank Group to fostindex.jpger international cooperation to adapt and develop energy storage solutions for developing countries

VANCOUVER, May 28, 2019 – On the occasion of the 10th Clean Energy Ministerial and 4th Mission Innovation Ministerial, a new international partnership has been established to help expand the deployment of energy storage and bring new technologies to developing countries’ power systems. The Energy Storage Partnership (ESP) comprises the World Bank Group and 29 organizations working together to help develop energy storage solutions tailored to the needs of developing countries.

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Facing substantial investment needs, developing countries must sustainably manage debt

With just over ten years until 2030, developing countries face important and complex debt-socialmedia2.jpgchallenges around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  Not least of which is how to finance the investments needed to achieve them.

Estimates suggest that developing countries face a $2.5 trillion annual financing gap to meet the SDGs. Other studies conclude that the challenge of meeting this annual financing gap is substantial in low-income countries, which would require additional annual spending of 15.5 percentage points of GDP in 2030, focused relatively evenly on infrastructure and education and health.

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Which Way to Livable and Productive Cities? : A Road Map for Sub-Saharan Africa

For African cities to grow economically as they have grown in size, they must create 9781464814051_pdfproductive environments to attract investments, increase economic efficiency, and create livable environments that prevent urban costs from rising with increased population densification. What are the central obstacles that prevent African cities and towns from becoming sustainable engines of economic growth and prosperity? Among the most critical factors that limit the growth and livability of urban areas are land markets, investments in public infrastructure and assets, and the institutions to enable both. To unleash the potential of African cities and towns for delivering services and employment in a livable and environmentally friendly environment, a sequenced approach is needed to reform institutions and policies and to target infrastructure investments. This book lays out three foundations that need fixing to guide cities and towns throughout Sub-Saharan Africa on their way to productivity and livability.

Download full report here.

 

Year in review: 2018 in 14 facts

As 2018 has ended extreme poverty is at the lowest level in recorded history but is yearinreview2018expected to become increasingly concentrated in one region. A record number of people have been forcibly displaced from their homes, and an influential new report confirms we’re running out of time to limit global warming. Yet, innovation and disruptive technologies are helping to bring clean energy to millions and connecting hundreds of millions of people to the financial system. These 14 facts tell a story about the challenges we face — and the actions needed to create a more inclusive, sustainable world.

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The Safe Food Imperative: Accelerating Progress in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

STORY HIGHLIGHTSfood_key

  • Unsafe food costs low- and middle-income economies US$ 110 billion in lost productivity and medical expenses each year.
  • Preventative measures—including greater investment, better regulatory frameworks and measures that promote behavior change—can help countries avoid food safety problems
  • An inclusive approach to food safety management that makes food safety a shared responsibility among government, farmers, food businesses and consumers will be most effective

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Shortage of Long-Term Finance Blunts Progress in Developing Countries

Article originally published here

Long-term finance is essential for households, firms and sustainable development.

WASHINGTON, September 14, 2015—A shortage of long-term financing since the 2008 crisis is choking the investment-backed growth of companies in developing countries and hampering the ability of credit-worthy families to borrow for education and housing needs and escape poverty, a new World Bank report warned today.

According to the new report: ‘Global Financial Development Report 2015-2016: Long-term Financing,’ extending the maturity structure of finance is considered to be at the core of sustainable financial development. ( Full report available: www.worldbank.org/financialdevelopment )

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