Webinar April 9th – COVID-19: Vaccines for Developing Countries

About the Event: LINK

The rollout of COVID-19 vaccines in developing countries is critical to protecting lives, building human capital, and stimulating economic recovery. The current crisis is exacerbating inequalities throughout the world and, without access to vaccines, the gap will widen further. Ensuring developing countries can access, as well as safely distribute vaccines, calls for strong partnership and cooperation at the national, regional & global levels. This event will explore:  

Continue reading

Assessing Country Readiness for COVID-19 Vaccines – First Insights from the Assessment Rollout

The global COVID-19 vaccination campaign will be the largest in history. The delivery of

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 03rd Mar, 2021. A healthcare worker holds a vial of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine during the first phase of the country nationwide vaccination drive at the Hospital UiTM in Sungai Buloh, outskirts of Kuala Lumpur. Credit: SO

COVID-19 vaccines presents challenges unprecedented in scale, speed and specificities, especially in low- and middleincome countries. In November 2020, anticipating the availability of safe and effective vaccines for COVID-19, the World  Bank together with WHO, UNICEF, the Global Fund, and Gavi rolled out readiness assessments in more than 100 low and middle-income countries.

Continue reading

We must prepare supply chains for future COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics

Nothing would undermine delivery of successful COVID-19 (coronavirus) vaccines and gs1_forumtherapeutic treatments faster than the emergence of fake vaccines.  Health development and financing institutions already have their work cut out to raise public awareness and acceptance of these potential pandemic ending-solutions. The proliferation of falsified versions in marketplaces around the world would make the job even harder. The likely diversion of these highly prized commodities away from priority or underserved recipients would also be tragic. COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics could be the catalyst to step up efforts around medicine traceability, but supply chains need to make fast progress. 

Continue reading