How is the World Bank tackling COVID-19 in fragile and conflict-affected settings?

The COVID-19 (coronavirus) crisis has caused thousands of deaths and shaken the mali-covidworld’s richest countries to their core. What happens when it makes its way to low-and middle-income countries, which could face destabilizing and lasting shocks from its health and economic impacts? This is especially true for countries impacted by fragility, conflict and violence (FCV), where cases of COVID-19 infection are increasing. Nearly one-third of our total project investments in 100 countries so far have focused on countries impacted by fragility and conflict —from Afghanistan and Iraq to Somalia and Haiti —  to help them face a multi-layered crisis of a magnitude no one has faced before.

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World Bank Job Fair

Join us on Monday, February 3, 2020 for this special job fair to learn about over 100 FCV_image_lastexciting positions that the World Bank is looking to fill by June this year.

As part of a recruitment drive to increase its support for countries dealing with fragility, conflict and violence (FCV), the World Bank Group invites applications from qualified candidates interested in international development. The majority of positions will be located in Sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, and East Asia.

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World Bank Group Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence

Update: Phase 2 consultations are open until January 16, 2020. webpage-teaser2

The World Bank Group has released its draft strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV). The objective of the strategy is to address the drivers of FCV in affected countries and their impact on vulnerable populations, with the ultimate goal of contributing to peace and prosperity. To ensure the strategy benefits from a wide range of inputs, the World Bank Group is undertaking global consultations to inform the strategy’s development.

Timeframe: April 2019 – January 2020

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Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV)

The World Bank Group is developing its first strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence fragilityforum_logo(FCV). The overarching objective of the strategy is to address the drivers of FCV in affected countries and their impact on vulnerable populations, with the ultimate goal of contributing to peace and prosperity. The final strategy will seek to guide and systematize the World Bank Group’s work in FCV contexts over the next five years.

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Launching global consultations on the World Bank Group’s upcoming Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence

April marked the official launch of global consultations to inform the World Bank Boys Play Football Near IDP Camp in MogadishuGroup’s first-ever Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV). Over the next two months, World Bank Group teams will engage with civil society and government representatives, as well as partner organizations and the private sector to discuss priorities and challenges in FCV situations , building on the comparative advantage of the Bank Group in fragile settings. As we embark on this process, the most relevant question for us is how to build on progress made and optimize our interventions to be our most effective on the ground, with special focus on making a lasting difference for the most vulnerable populations. Furthermore, in FCV settings, we know that no single organization can act alone – as the World Bank Group, this strategy is about positioning our analytical, operational, and convening power to contribute to broader international efforts in support of peace and prosperity.

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The ripple effects of war: How violence can persist after formal peace is declared

When I first visited the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2007 as a public health menwomenchildrenkenyaresearcher, I was trying to understand the complex issue of how young men get recruited into rebel groups in war-torn regions of central Africa. What I learned was both surprising and heartbreaking: a person who experienced war violence as a child could be more likely to engage in conflict as a young adult. Young men who had experienced extreme war violence in their past would often state this as a reason to take up arms. Even more tragically, these same young men would often struggle to reintegrate peacefully into their communities when hostilities ended. The violence they had experienced their whole lives through war persisted within their homes and communities even when formal peace was declared.

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