COVID-19 in fragile settings: Ensuring a conflict-sensitive response

Violent conflict often exacerbates the spread of infectious diseases , as seen in the recent resurgence of polio in Syria, cholera outbreaks in the conflict zones in Yemen, and the persistence of Ebola in insecure eastern regions of the Democratic Republicdrc-ebola-2 of Congo (DRC). Between 2009 and 2017, in fact, there were 364 disease outbreaks in 108 refugee camps. Fragility and conflict reverse hard-won development gains and stunt opportunities for children, youth, and the poorest people. In the process, they deeply weaken health systems, leaving societies more vulnerable to disease outbreaks.

Continue reading

Fragility and Conflict: On the Front Lines of the Fight against Poverty

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • A new report estimates that by 2030 up to two-thirds of the global extreme poor will Imagebe living in FCS, making it evident that without intensified action, the global poverty goals will not be met.
  • The new report, “Fragility and Conflict: On the Front Lines of the Fight against Poverty” notes that the 43 countries in the world with the highest poverty rates are in FCS and/or Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • The number of people living in proximity to conflict — defined as within 60 kilometers of at least 25 conflict-related deaths — has nearly doubled since 2007.

Globally, the prevalence of fragile and conflict-affected situations (FCS) continues to rise. The number of forcibly displaced people worldwide has more than doubled since 2012, exceeding 74 million in 2018. A new report estimates that by 2030 up to two-thirds of the global extreme poor may be living in FCS, making it evident that without intensified action, the global poverty goals will not be met.

The new report, “Fragility and Conflict: On the Front Lines of the Fight against Poverty,” notes that the 43 countries in the world with the highest poverty rates are in FCS and/or Sub-Saharan Africa.  Economies facing chronic fragility and conflict have had poverty rates stuck at over 40 percent in the past decade, while countries that have escaped FCS have cut their poverty rates by more than half. Today, a person living in an economy facing chronic fragility and conflict is 10 times more likely to be poor than a person living in a country that hasn’t been in conflict or fragility in the past 20 years.

Continue reading

World Bank Job Fair

Join us on Monday, February 3, 2020 for this special job fair to learn about over 100 FCV_image_lastexciting positions that the World Bank is looking to fill by June this year.

As part of a recruitment drive to increase its support for countries dealing with fragility, conflict and violence (FCV), the World Bank Group invites applications from qualified candidates interested in international development. The majority of positions will be located in Sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, and East Asia.

Continue reading

World Bank Group Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence

Update: Phase 2 consultations are open until January 16, 2020. webpage-teaser2

The World Bank Group has released its draft strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV). The objective of the strategy is to address the drivers of FCV in affected countries and their impact on vulnerable populations, with the ultimate goal of contributing to peace and prosperity. To ensure the strategy benefits from a wide range of inputs, the World Bank Group is undertaking global consultations to inform the strategy’s development.

Timeframe: April 2019 – January 2020

Submit Your Feedback

 

Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV)

The World Bank Group is developing its first strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence fragilityforum_logo(FCV). The overarching objective of the strategy is to address the drivers of FCV in affected countries and their impact on vulnerable populations, with the ultimate goal of contributing to peace and prosperity. The final strategy will seek to guide and systematize the World Bank Group’s work in FCV contexts over the next five years.

Continue reading

Launching global consultations on the World Bank Group’s upcoming Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence

April marked the official launch of global consultations to inform the World Bank Boys Play Football Near IDP Camp in MogadishuGroup’s first-ever Strategy for Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV). Over the next two months, World Bank Group teams will engage with civil society and government representatives, as well as partner organizations and the private sector to discuss priorities and challenges in FCV situations , building on the comparative advantage of the Bank Group in fragile settings. As we embark on this process, the most relevant question for us is how to build on progress made and optimize our interventions to be our most effective on the ground, with special focus on making a lasting difference for the most vulnerable populations. Furthermore, in FCV settings, we know that no single organization can act alone – as the World Bank Group, this strategy is about positioning our analytical, operational, and convening power to contribute to broader international efforts in support of peace and prosperity.

Continue reading

Featured Spring Meeting Events

These are some of our featured events you shouldn’t miss Spring

Don’t worry if you can’t be at #WBGMeetings in person. We’ve got you covered with World Bank Live. Block out time now to watch our events live, and in case you miss it, you can still catch up with our World Bank Group activities on our Spring Meetings live blog.

Continue reading

Let’s work together to prevent violence and protect the vulnerable against fragility

crowd_ffLast week, in a gathering of governments and organizations at the World Bank-hosted 2018 Fragility Forum, the international community took an important step forward in fighting fragility by sharpening our understanding of it, hearing directly from those affected by it and thinking collectively through what we must do to overcome it.

We all agreed, acting on a renewed understanding of fragility and what it means to vulnerable communities represents an urgent and collective responsibility. We’ve all seen the suffering. In places like Syria, Myanmar, Yemen and South Sudan, the loss of life, dignity and economic prosperity is rife. With more than half of the world’s poor expected to live in fragile settings by 2030, we can’t end poverty unless we promote stability, prosperity, and peace in these places ravaged by conflict and crisis.

Continue reading

The 2018 Fragility Forum: Managing risks for peace and stability

twittercard3c_002In just under two weeks, about 1,000 people will gather in Washington D.C. for the 2018 Fragility Forum. Policy makers from developed and developing countries, practitioners from humanitarian agencies, development institutions and the peace and security communities, academics and representatives of the private sector will come together with the goal of increasing our collective impact in countries affected by fragility, conflict and violence (FCV).

Continue reading