Culture – the “X Factor” for Building Back Better after Conflict and Disasters

STORY HIGHLIGHTSBosnia-and-Herzegovina-Mostar-2-Asiastock-Shutterstock

  • As the world continues to urbanize rapidly, cities are increasingly bearing the brunt of conflicts, crises, and disasters, which have a devastating effect on culture.
  • A new World Bank-UNESCO Position Paper, Culture in City Reconstruction and Recovery (CURE), proposes an enhanced culture-based framework for city reconstruction and recovery.
  • The CURE Framework marks an important milestone in the partnership between the World Bank and UNESCO on culture, urban development, and resilience.

The 2018 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals: an all-new visual guide to data and development

sdg-atlas-2018-cover-400px“The World Bank is one of the world’s largest producers of development data and research. But our responsibility does not stop with making these global public goods available; we need to make them understandable to a general audience.

When both the public and policy makers share an evidence-based view of the world, real advances in social and economic development, such as achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), become possible.” – Shanta Devarajan

We’re pleased to release the 2018 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals. With over 180 maps and charts, the new publication shows the progress societies are making towards the 17 SDGs.

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Increasing Salinity in a Changing Climate Likely to Alter Sundarban’s Ecosystem

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  • The salinity of river water and soil in Bangladesh’s low-lying southwest coastal region is increasing over time, and will aggravate further with sea-level rise in a changing climate.
  • The increase in salinity will reduce the Sunderbans’ key species Sundri, the forest’s highest-value timber species, and increase saline-tolerant species Gewa, Baen and Goran.
  • The progressive water salinization will change the availability of many freshwater fish species, thereby depriving the poor of their main source of protein, and adversely impacting the incomes of families. The poor populations that will lose freshwater fish species are about six times greater in number than those who will be gaining brackish fish species.

 

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