Future-proofing cities: How our prosperity tomorrow depends on transforming cities today

Today, 4.4 billion people— just over half the world’s population—live in cities. In just the next adobestock_226185431-herothree decades, two out of every three people on the planet will live in cities.  Cities are the drivers of productivity and prosperity: over 80 percent of all economic activity is concentrated in them. But they are also on the frontlines of multiple crises – feeling the impacts of COVID-19, of conflict and fleeing populations, and of climate change – that can exacerbate risks and widen inequalities.

Continue reading

Investing in cities today is the key for a resilient future

By 2050, cities will be home to an additional 2.5 billion people, with two out of every threekatowice2 people living in urban areas.  The mounting impacts of climate change, combined with the COVID-19 pandemic and its aftermath, and conflict and fleeing populations, hit cities the hardest and requires them to become resilient to shock waves of change. Cities are also uniquely vulnerable to climate shocks and natural disasters. At the same time, investing in cities can deliver major impact for green, resilient, and inclusive growth.

Continue reading

Annual Report 2020

Building a resilient and inclusive recovery: World Bank Group Annual Meetings to focus on the path ahead for developing countries

The coronavirus pandemic wreaked havoc around the world and dealt a major setback to ~ai-e1a5e571-84d0-4e46-be18-9fdf3fd42133_decades of development outcomes. Last spring, we successfully championed a moratorium on debt for the world’s poorest countries and launched a fast, broad-based response to COVID-19. We are financing emergency operations in over 111 countries – home to 70% of the global population- which has been the largest and fastest crisis response in the World Bank Group’s history.

Continue reading

Where Climate Change Is Reality: Supporting Africa’s Sahel Pastoralists to Secure a Resilient Future

One morning in February, in Kaffrine Region, Senegal, Kaffia Diallo emerged from her tent. She praps2is happy; her new grandson was born just two days earlier. “A beautiful baby,” she said, “although I wish he weighed a little more.”

Continue reading