A transformed fertilizer market is needed in response to the food crisis in Africa

One clear message from my dozen meetings last week with African leaders who were in Washington for a summit with the U.S. government was that fertilizer prices are out of reach for most farmers, putting the crop cycle and rural stability at risk. Across 45 countries globally, 205 million people are in acute food insecurity, meaning they have so little access to food that their lives and livelihoods are in danger.  One key obstacle to food production in many developing countries is access to fertilizers, which enrich the soil with the nutrients needed for healthy crops. Sufficient primary raw materials – nitrogen, potash, phosphate, and natural gas – and fertilizer production facilities are essential to farmers across the developing world, but high fertilizer prices are blocking the 2023 and 2024 crop cycle.

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Food Security Update

Download latest Food Security Updatefood-security-page

August 15, 2022 – Record high food prices have triggered a global crisis that will drive millions more into extreme poverty, magnifying hunger and malnutrition, while threatening to erase hard-won gains in development. The war in Ukraine, supply chain disruptions, and the continued economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic are reversing years of development gains and pushing food prices to all-time highs. Rising food prices have a greater impact on people in low- and middle-income countries, since they spend a larger share of their income on food than people in high-income countries. This brief looks at rising food insecurity and World Bank responses to date. 

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Food and Security Update

AT A GLANCE
The agricultural, cereal, and export price indices were stable over the past 2 weeks.

Domestic food price inflation remains high around the world. High inflation continues in almost all low
income and middleincome countries, and the share of highincome countries with high inflation is also
increasing sharply.

Russia and Ukraine signed an agreement to free more than 20 million tonnes of grain stuck in Ukraine’s Black
Sea ports.

The war in Ukraine threatens poor countries with overlapping food and debt crises.

The Horn of Africa is suffering its worst drought in more than 40 years.

FULL REPORT

 

 

Job: Junior Professional Associate

Junior Professional Associate

Job #: req12469
Organization: World Bank
Grade: Ungraded
Term Duration:  2 years 0 months
Recruitment Type: Local Recruitment
Location: Global based on business need
Required Language(s): English

Description

Junior Professional Associates – Program Description

The Junior Professional Associate (JPA) program is a unique opportunity to gain entry-level professional experience and first-hand exposure to the challenges – and rewards – of international development. 

 
Are you a recent graduate? Do you have passion for and commitment to helping others? Are you looking for a solid, two-year entry-level work experience in a multicultural environment? If so, you may be interested in the the World Bank’s JPA program.
 
 
In your JPA assignment, you’ll use your strong quantitative and qualitative analytical skills, your knowledge of technology and your research abilities – working with more senior colleagues and project teams in their work both in operations and in corporate functions. You’ll have an opportunity to hone your skills and acquire new ones while gaining first-hand exposure to the challenges of reducing poverty and boosting shared prosperity. Your experience as a JPA may be used as a steppingstone to a career in government, consulting, the private sector, academia or other development agencies.
 
 
What are we looking for?
 
 
Your academic achievements are superior and place you in the top portion of your graduating class. Your analytical and research skills extend to areas of specialization such as: economics, finance, human development (public health, education, nutrition, population), social sciences (anthropology, sociology), agriculture, environment (climate, blue economy), infrastructure, private sector development, as well as other related fields, including corporate and administrative functions (IT, legal, accounting, communications, etc.).

You are fluent in English and, preferably, in at least one other Bank language (French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Portuguese, or Chinese). You love technology and integrate it in your work.

 
What are we offering you?
 
 
We will provide you with the opportunity to gain entry-level professional experience in a premier development institution, on a two-year, non-renewable Extended Term Consultant (ETC) contract with benefits.
 
 
Eligibility Criteria
 
 
The following are minimum requirements to be eligible for the JPA program: 

     – Be 28 years of age or younger on your first day of service

     – Hold the equivalent of a Bachelor’s degree with a superior academic record

     – Be fluent in English

     – One or more of the Bank’s working languages is a plus: Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish 

 
Since this employment program is highly competitive, applicants under active consideration for employment may be asked to submit academic records as well as references. The World Bank will contact only those applicants whom hiring managers wish to interview.
 
 
Positions may be located in any of the World Bank’s offices across the world.
 
 
A JPA assignment is not an entry point for a career at the World Bank and employment beyond the two-year contract will be prohibited for a period of two years after the end of the contract. However, some former JPAs may rejoin the organization later in their careers after gaining experience elsewhere and becoming experts in their professional fields.
 
 
Recruitment and hiring for this employment category is ongoing throughout the year.
 
 
How do I apply?
 
 
Interested candidates may apply online. (Please take care to provide required information where indicated). Please note that applications will be kept active in our database for a period of six months. Should you still be interested in JPA program after six months, you will need to re-apply. Only those identified for an assignment will be contacted to discuss their interest and availability. Candidates are selected by the hiring manager on a highly competitive basis.
 
 
The World Bank continually searches for qualified individuals with a diverse set of backgrounds from around the globe. We are proud to be an equal opportunity and inclusive employer with a dedicated and committed workforce, and do not discriminate based on gender, gender identity, religion, race, color, ethnicity, sexual orientation or disability.
 
 
Individuals with disabilities may be provided reasonable accommodations to perform essential functions and support in receiving other workplace accommodations. Please contact the Disability Accommodation Fund at disabilityfund@worldbank.org for further information and support.

Poverty has no borders, neither does excellence. We succeed because of our differences and we continuously search for qualified individuals with diverse backgrounds from around the globe.

 

 

 

World Bank Scales Up its Financing for Food Security with Additional $315 Million to Strengthen the Resilience of Food Systems across West Africa

WASHINGTON, July 29, 2022 – Some additional 2 million people will benefit from a second ghana-food-securityphase of the West Africa regional Food Systems Resilience Program (FSRP-2) approved today for a total amount of $315 million in International Development Association (IDA*) financing. FSRP-2 will support Chad, Ghana and Sierra Leone to increase their preparedness against food insecurity and to improve the resilience of their food systems. This comes at a moment where it is projected that approximately 38.3 million people in West Africa are projected to be in food security crisis.

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How to manage the world’s fertilizers to avoid a prolonged food crisis

Hidden behind the worst global food crisis in a decade, fertilizer prices have skyrocketedag_blog_july_22_1140x500_1117767635_9d624e5836_o and remain volatile . This poses a serious threat to food security, as the planting season starts this summer. So far, the war in Ukraine has mostly affected countries importing wheat and corn. But many countries, including some major food exporters, are net fertilizer importers. Persistently high fertilizer prices may spread to a broader variety of crops including rice, a staple which has not yet seen war-related price hikes. We must act now to make fertilizers more accessible and affordable to avoid prolonging the food crisis.   

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For poor countries already facing debt distress, a food crisis looms

The war in Ukraine could soon deliver a tragic blow to many of the world’s poorest countries: shutterstock_2138413595_food_crisis_1140x500many of the countries at greatest risk of a debt crisis are now grappling with the threat of a food crisis as well.  

Food-import bills are surging fastest for poor countries that are already in debt distress or at high risk of it , the World Bank’s latest data show. Over the next year, the tab for imports of wheat, rice, and maize in these countries is expected to rise by the equivalent of more than 1 percent of GDP. That is more than twice the size of the 2021-2022 increase—and, given the relatively small size of these economies, it’s also twice as large as the expected increase for middle-income economies.

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