eC2: Imagery collection in Indonesia (Drone and street-view)

Deadline: 05-Dec-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)

 

The World Bank invites the submission of Expressions of Interest (EOI) from qualifiedpexels-photo-235829.jpeg firms to supply drone and street-view imagery data collection services in a secondary city in Indonesia. For the street view images, the firm will be expected to use both a car mounted camera as well as more portable 360-degree devices. For the drone images, the size of the area of interest (AOI) will total roughly 80 square meters, however the data can be parsed into manageable sized mosaics.

All of the images submitted by the firm will be used to create a unified and detailed housing inventory database that assesses the quality, characteristics, and potential risks of each home.

Continue reading

Top 7 disruptive technologies for cities

7_disruptive_techImagine you were working in development and poverty reduction in the early 1990s (I was!). Only one website existed in all the world in August 1991 (today there are over 1.5 billion). Mobile phones were expensive, rare, and clunky. Very few would anticipate a situation in which India would have more mobile phones than toilets.

To paraphrase Bill Gates: we tend to overestimate the changes that will happen in the short term and underestimate those in the long term. Technology is quietly but radically disrupting and transforming how cities deliver services to their citizens. It does that in a way that fundamentally alters not just the mode of delivery but its underlying economics and financing.

Continue reading

Finger Splints, Coding, Drones and R2D2: The Evolving Face of Technology and Development

Blood-delivering drones? Check. 3D-printer working off grid to print finger splints?drone Check. Disadvantaged women trained and employed in software-developing? Check. Is this how technology can deliver for development?

First things first. Let’s go back to the first principles. The World Bank’s World Development Report 2016 used a 3X3 framework to think about digital technology from a development lens: inclusion, efficiency and innovation for people, governments and businesses. Digital technologies, when employed as a tool for development, have the capacity to promote inclusive economies and societies, build upon existing capital and generate economies of scale. Herein lies powerful potential.

Continue reading