eC2: Waste Management Sector including Marine Plastics Debris Sources Deep Dive Study for selected Eastern Caribbean countries.

Deadline: 20-Apr-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) index

Assessment to further understand the sources of solid waste/marine litter in the Caribbean region and to provide a comprehensive picture of marine pollution at national and regional levels. The assessment will help inform policy makers to protect their valuable coastal and marine natural capital and to obtain the full benefits of a Blue Economy. The selected firm will carry out the following activities: (i)Solid Waste and Sewage Waste Sectors rapid assessment/roadmap for selected countries;(ii) Diagnostic of plastic management inventory in OECS countries; and (iii) Assessment of plastics abatement policies, investments, and regional solutions. Contract with selected firm is expected to be signed by May 1, 2020. Services are expected to be carried out between May 2020 and October 2020.

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Can technology help mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on education systems in Europe and Central Asia?

The last few weeks have witnessed heightened awareness of the threat from the blog1-herooutbreak of COVID-19 (coronavirus). As the virus spreads around the world, we also need to understand what it means for the education systems of Europe and Central Asia.

With the need to contain the virus, many countries are implementing measures to reduce gatherings of large crowds. Our schools are not immune to these actions, nor to the spread of the virus. Many countries have now implemented measures in their education systems – from banning gatherings to the temporary closing of schools.

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Wastewater A Resource that Can Pay Dividends for People, the Environment, and Economies, Says World Bank

WASHINGTON, March 19, 2020—The world’s wastewater – 80 percent of which is

released into the environment without adequate treatment – is a valuable resource from which clean water, energy, nutrients, and other resources can be recovered, according to a World Bank report released today to mark World Water Day.

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Korea’s response to COVID-19: Early lessons in tackling the pandemic

The Republic of Korea was one of the first countries to tackle the COVID-19 crisis. Facing a rapid, exponential increase in infections after the first positive case w

Figure 1. Coronavirus cases in Korea (Source: Central Disaster and Safety Countermeasures Headquarters.)

as identified on January 20, the country took decisive action to contain the virus. Although the total number of cases is high, daily increases have been declining steadily from a peak of just above 900 in late February to around 100 by the second week of March (Figure 1). Recovered cases now far outnumber new cases, and deaths have been kept just above 100 as of this writing.

Figure 1.  Coronavirus cases in Korea

Source: Central Disaster and Safety Countermeasures Headquarters.

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World Bank Group Increases COVID-19 Response to $14 Billion To Help Sustain Economies, Protect Jobs

Focus on private sector and workers spearheaded by IFC to mitigate financial and economic impact of crisis

WASHINGTON, March 17, 2020 — The World Bank and IFC’s Boards of Directors approved today an increased $14 billion package of fast-track financing to assist companies and countries in their efforts to prevent, detect and respond to the rapid spread of COVID-19. The package will strengthen national systems for public health preparedness, including for disease containment, diagnosis, and treatment, and support the private sector.

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eC2: Actuarial modelling of financial losses from Flood Risk in Morocco

Deadline:  30-Mar-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)floods

The World Bank DRFIP framework aims to strengthen the capacity of governments to take informed decisions on disaster risk finance, based on sound financial/actuarial analysis and to support stakeholders with better risk information for financial resilience. To support Morocco’s Solidarity Fund and more broadly other World Bank clients in need for actuarial modelling of financial contingent liability, the DRFIP seeks to develop a flood risk model for the Moroccan territory (which could eventually be reused to other countries or contexts). This model should allow the estimate of the probabilistic loss distribution for various risk categories or protection scheme beneficiaries, for Morocco as a whole (ground up losses), as well as for FSEC specifically.

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How have women’s legal rights evolved over the last 50 years?

Today, women have just three-quarters of the legal rights of men. In 1970, it was less womanthan half. The Women, Business and the Law 2020 report presented results from our recent effort to document how laws have changed since 1970. This exceptional dataset has already facilitated ground-breaking research that shows that a country’s performance on the Women, Business and the Law index is associated with more women in the labor force, a smaller wage gap between men and women, and greater investments in health and education. We hope that sharing the data and reform descriptions on our website will lead to more evidence that will inspire policymakers to change their laws so that more women can contribute to economic growth and development.

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Coronavirus and the ‘Pangolin Effect’: Increased exposure to wildlife poses health, biosafety and global security risks

Everything is connected. shutterstock_794728702_resized

Using the theory of chaos, when a butterfly flaps its wings in New Mexico it has the power to cause a hurricane in China. But there’s hardly anything of the butterfly effect’s randomness in the dominos that keep falling after the emergence of COVID-19 (coronavirus). The explanation that is emerging is in fact more familiar: how human beings’ connected actions can result in dramatic consequences.

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It’s time we invest in healthy food systems for a safer world

The World Bank Group last week announced it would make available a package of $12 Meta-chicken-COVID-corornavirusbillion — an unprecedented level of financing to help developing countries and businesses cope with the health and economic impacts caused by COVID-19. Much of that support will naturally be reactive, financing immediate measures designed to strengthen our response to a brand-new threat. But some of the financing will also be preventative — as it should be, if we are to learn our lessons from the past and strengthen our collective hand before the next bug hits.

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eC2: Strengths and limitations of satellite-derived soil moisture for drought risk financing

Deadline:  25-Mar-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) afr-moving-away-from-humanitarian-appeals-to-managing-droughts-in-ethiopia-feature-780x439

The main objective of this project is to support World Bank Crisis & Disaster Risk Finance activities in the area of anticipatory and/or parametric climate risk financing with tailored data- and research-driven approaches applied to promising satellite-derived datasets that have so far not been considered for operational purposes. In the context of the Next Generation Drought Index project, the World Banks Disaster Risk Financing and Insurance program is developing a technical toolbox to guide users at both micro and macro level through the entire process of data selection, index design, calibration, validation and related methods to strengthen sensitivity analysis and historical skill analysis. There is scientific evidence about the added-value of satellite-derived soil moisture products to close critical gaps between rainfall anomalies and the response of the land surface. However, a quantitative and qualitative analysis in 2-3 specific areas of interest is required to identify and explain the individual strengths and limitations of different products that may differ in sensor technology (radar/radiometer/combined), method (remote sensing vs. data assimilation), output variable (surface or root-zone soil moisture, soil moisture-based rainfall estimations), timeliness (annual updates vs. NRT products), revisit period (depending on area of interest) and spatial resolution (<1 km to >25 km). Since anticipatory financing mechanisms that decouple insurance payouts from loss assessments are a priority, the work on soil moisture products should highlight the potential predictive skill of various datasets, whereas the integration of both publicly available and, if available, commercial products in the analysis is encouraged.

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