Inclusive and Trusted Digital ID Can Unlock Opportunities for the World’s Most Vulnerable

Juan and his family fled their home during Peru’s 1995 insurgency. Like many other ID4DPeruvians, they left behind all of their possessions, including their IDs and other documents. Without an ID, Juan—along with 3 million other Peruvians whose civil registration records were lost or destroyed during this period—was unable to enroll in school or access basic social services.

Mariam, a cross border trader from Uganda, struggled to earn a livelihood because of the difficulty she faced in crossing the border to buy and sell goods in Kenya. Without the necessary IDs, she could not pass through regular border crossings and was forced to travel long distances in dangerous areas that left her vulnerable to theft and exploitation.

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eC2: Nigeria ID4D Gender Deep Dive

Deadline: 12-Mar-2019 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) id4d-global-dataset

The Gender Deep Dive aims specifically to analyze gender gaps in access to government-recognized IDs in Nigeria and provide evidence-based advice to policy makers on how to address barriers that women may face in obtaining an ID. It is important to address this gender gap in women’s lack of access to IDs both because the ability to prove ones identity is a fundamental right, and because IDs are instrumental to accessing many other rights and services where proof of identity is required, such as financial services, ownership of mobile phones, health services, social protection, and claiming rights under the law.

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Identification as a centerpiece for development: What can other countries learn from Peru?

Peru has placed so much emphasis on the importance of identification that it has createdjuan_me7a9806.jpg a museum dedicated to it. The “Museum of Identification” in Lima demonstrates to visitors the significance of identity in the country’s narrative. In fact, the Incas, centuries before the Europeans arrived, kept track of the population by using “quipus”, an accounting tool based on strings, with each node denoting a village or community.

Peru has continued to prioritize identification, and the uniqueness of each person—long before the Sustainable Development Goals made “legal identity for all and free birth registrations” a global priority (SDG 16.9).

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Demystifying technologies for digital identification

Fingerprint Binary MicrochipWith more than 1.1 billion individuals without official proof of identity, a myriad of technologies is advancing at a faster speed than ever before and becoming more affordable, making it possible for nations to leapfrog paper based approaches of the past. Yet, it is becoming a challenge to understand and keep up with the various technologies and advancements that are especially relevant for digital identification systems. Identification for Development (ID4D) launches a new Technology Landscape report providing an overview of current and emerging technology trends in digital identity.

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Counting the uncounted: 1.1 billion people without IDs

The World Bank Blog: Vyjayanti T Desai

An estimated 1.1 billion people worldwide cannot officially prove their identity, accordingid4d-global-dataset to the 2017 update of the World Bank’s Identification for Development (ID4D) Global Dataset.

Identification matters

How do we prove who we are to the people and institutions with whom we interact? Imagine trying to open your first bank account, prove your eligibility for health insurance, or apply for university without an ID; quality of life and opportunities become severely restricted.  An officially-recognized form of ID is the key enabler – critical not only for exercising a wide range of rights but also for accessing healthcare, education, finance, and other essential services. According to the World Bank Group’s latest estimates, this is problematic for an estimated 1.1 billion people around the globe.

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