Moving toward green mobility: three countries, three different paths

As discussions concluded at COP24, countries still struggle to translate their climate lu-local-bus-franz_bous-flickrcommitments into effective and socially acceptable actions. This sense of stagnation is particularly evident in transport. With 23% of energy-related GHG emissions coming from the sector, transitioning to greener mobility will be crucial to the overall success of the climate agenda. Yet the world remains largely reliant on fossil fuels to move people and goods from A to B. As shown in Sustainable Mobility for All’s Global Roadmap of Action, there are multiple policy options that could help countries move the needle on green mobility, each with their own fiscal and political costs. To illustrate this, let’s look at three countries that did take concrete measures to cut carbon emissions from transport but opted for three different options: France, Luxembourg, and Norway.

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Tackling climate change in the poorest countries

How can we help the poorest countries deal with climate change? The challenge is huge. Globally, the last three years were the hottest on record.  Emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels and industry started rising again in 2017 after briefly leveling off. Many regions are experiencing more severe and frequent storms, floods, and drought. According to the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, the climate consequences of a 2°C warmer world are far greater than for a rise of 1.5°C, and we are not on track for either. 20120903-burundi-farhat-9869

Recognizing the urgent need for more action, the World Bank Group announced new and ambitious targets for our climate work with developing countries at COP24, this month’s global climate change conference in Katowice, Poland.

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Time to ask the tough questions about transport and climate

Last month, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change drew global attention by th-bangkok-traffic-bernard-spragg-flickr_0providing fresh and overwhelming evidence about the urgency of the climate situation. According to the agency’s latest report, global temperatures will reach 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels within the next 12 years—unless we act now.

Transport bears a huge responsibility in the current situation: the sector contributes to nearly a quarter of global energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and 18% of all manmade emissions in the global economy.  Under a business-as-usual scenario, this figure will continue rising to reach 1/3 of all emissions by 2040.
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COP24 Kicks off in Katowice next Week: Here’s What You Need to Know

STORY HIGHLIGHTSuntitled

  • The 2018 UN Climate Change Conference of Parties (COP) will take place at the International Congress Centre in Katowice, Poland, from December 3 to 15.
  • The priority outcome from negotiations at COP24 will be the finalization of the “Paris rulebook”, namely, the framework of rules that will guide the implementation of the Paris Agreement.
  • The World Bank Group will announce new climate targets for 2025, including a major boost on adaptation, as well as analytical work on new mobility, transport, the energy sector, and the just transition, focusing on delivering low carbon pathways to development.

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