Making markets work for all: Unlocking the private sector’s role in supporting refugees

The world is witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record.  Of the more thanifc_kenya_final_edit_0013.jpg 70.8 million forcibly displaced persons worldwide, around 41 million are people who have been displaced from their homes but remain in their home country and nearly 25.9 million are refugees who have fled their countries.

One surprising fact: Some 85 percent of those who fled are hosted not in rich countries, but in developing countries with limited resources.

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Does paying local leaders lead to better economic development?

Guest post by Gedeon Lim index

This is the thirteenth in this year’s series of posts by PhD students on the job market

Much of modern development efforts are channelled through local government structures. In 2020, for example, 248,160 Gram Panchayats in India will receive transfers of $8.3 billion; 41,913 Barangays in the Philippines will receive $2.5 billion; and in Indonesia, 74,000 rural villages have received annual transfers of $5.1 billion since 2014. Yet, despite the amount of resources devolved to local government, chief executives – Sarpanch (Gram Panchayat heads), Barangay captains, or village chiefs – are rarely paid a living wage for their time as local leaders.

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The learning crisis requires a new approach

For most children, turning 10 is an exciting moment. They’re learning more about the untitled.pngworld and expanding their horizons. But too many children – more than half of all 10-year-olds in low- and middle-income countries – cannot read and understand a simple story. We are in the middle of a global learning crisis that stifles opportunities and aspirations of hundreds of millions of children.   That is unacceptable.

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Something to Complain About: How to make government work for minorities

Guest post by M.R. Sharanindex

This is the thirteenth in this year’s series of posts by students on the job market. 

Earlier this year, we interviewed Mr Manjhi, an elected representative in rural Bihar (India) from an extremely marginalized caste group. He described his struggles with his prejudiced superior – an elected representative from a high caste – who refused to release funds to build public goods in Mr Manjhi’s ward. In his desperation, Mr Manjhi appealed to the higher state via a new mechanism he had only recently heard of – a formal complaints system. Over the next month and more, Mr Manjhi was called for “hearings” featuring his high-caste superior and a dispute-resolution officer of the higher bureaucracy. After scrutinizing the evidence and hearing both sides, the officer awarded the complaint in favour of Mr Manjhi and directed his superior to release funds immediately. Mr Manjhi used the funds to deliver piped water to all his constituents.

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Join the second World Bank and Financial Times’ blog writing competition for high school students

If you can read this, then you are already doing better than 53% of children in low- and ftblog.jpgmiddle-income countries, who can’t read a simple text by age 10. Being able to read is fundamental for children to be able to learn other subjects like science and history. It also creates opportunities and opens more doors for them as they get older.

What can be done to help children learn to read by the time they are 10 years old? We want to hear from you! 

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Putting biodiversity at the heart of IDA’s work

When people talk about biodiversity, it is often through the lens of conservation and theuntitled survival of animal and plant species. But the value drawn from a healthy biosphere is much more than that – it delivers a steady supply of food, water, jobs and livelihoods and helps to regulate climate.

Nature underpins all forms of life and economic activities, but this way of life is threatened on many fronts.  Our oceans are overfished and polluted with plastic; 1 million plant and animal species (out of 8 million) face extinction within decades, according to the latest scientific assessments, and deforestation and soil degradation have reached epic levels.

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Global Community Renews Commitment to the World’s Poorest Countries with $82 Billion

PRESS RELEASE NO: 2020/083/DFI

STOCKHOLM, December 13, 2019 — A global coalition of development partners announced today their commitment to maintain momentum in the fight against extreme poverty, with $82 billion for the International Development Association (IDA), the World Bank’s fund for the poorest. The financing, which includes more than $53 billion for Africa, will help countries invest in the needs of their people, boost economic growth, and bolster resilience to climate shocks and natural disasters.

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eC2: Disaster Risk and Resilience Analysis in Watersheds in Lao PDR

Deadline: 16-Jan-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.)water

Assignment objective: Disaster risks need to be understood and mapped in more detail in specific watersheds within large interconnected production and conservation forest landscapes, inhabited by thousands of communities, to be able to better develop, target and converge investments from a number of sectors and stakeholders.

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eC2: Closing Gaps in Womens Employment in the Africa Energy Sector Terms of Reference | AFR Womens Employment Consultancy

Deadline: 13-Jan-2020 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) rw_gender_ag_blog

There will be key criteria for the development of the deliverables:
1. Gender Gaps: A focus on gender equality priorities across the categories policy, leadership, employment, is expected.
2. Client Focus: The focus will be on providing relevant content and recommendations( strategies/remedial actions, activities and programmes) to the WB and KenGen which will be focused in the energy sector and other sectors such as education etc.
3. Partnerships: The consultant will be expected to map out feasible partnerships with e.g. like minded companies and institutions professional associations, universities and NGOs as part of the outputs delivered.
4. Budget and Sustainability: Key will be mapping costs and timelines of the interventions proposed in the gender options analysis. This is essential for sustainability.
5. Key Performance Indicators. What will be the success factors
6. Monitoring and Evaluation Framework. Define how to measure success

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Non-economic impacts of migration – winners and losers

In observance of the International Migrants Day, Dec 18

An Aging Nation

Chart 1: Ratio of working-age adults per retirement-age person

Immigration has a positive influence on the social and cultural fabric in host countries. In addition to its economic benefits which are well discussed in the World Bank Group Report, migration has a wide range of non-economic benefits for receiving countries. In host countries, immigration can help reverse or at least delay demographic decline and population aging due declining fertility. According to the US Census Bureau (2018),the ratio of working age adults to retirement-age persons is projected to decline to 2.5 by 2060, from 3.5 in 2020 (Chart 1). However, projections indicate that US population growth will be primarily driven by immigration after 2030 (See Chart 2).

 

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